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  • Author or Editor: Edgar A. Ott x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate use of electroacupuncture for treatment of horses with signs of chronic thoracolumbar pain.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—15 horses with signs of chronic thoracolumbar pain.

Procedure—Horses were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 treatment groups. Horses in group 1 received electroacupuncture stimulation (once every 3 days for 5 treatments), those in group 2 received phenylbutazone (2.2 mg/kg [1 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h, for 5 days), and those in group 3 received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (20 mL, PO, q 12 h, for 5 days). Thoracolumbar pain scores (TPSs) were evaluated before (baseline) and after each treatment.

Results—Mean ± SE TPSs in horses receiving phenylbutazone or saline solution did not change significantly during the study. After the third treatment, mean ± SE TPS (2.1 ± 0.6) in horses receiving electroacupuncture stimulation was significantly lower than baseline (6.0 ± 0.6) TPS. Mean ± SE TPSs in horses receiving electroacupuncture stimulation were significantly lower than baseline TPSs and TPSs in horses receiving phenylbutazone or saline solution after the third treatment to 14 days after the last treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—TPSs are useful for evaluating the efficacy of various analgesic methods used for treatment of thoracolumbar pain in horses. Electroacupuncture was effective for treatment of chronic thoracolumbar pain in horses. Results provided evidence that 3 sessions of electroacupuncture treatment can successfully alleviate signs of thoracolumbar pain in horses. The analgesic effect induced by electroacupuncture can last at least 2 weeks. Phenylbutazone administered PO did not effectively alleviate signs of thoracolumbar pain in horses in this study. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:281–286)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of ingestion of a high-carbohydrate versus a high-fat meal on relaxation of the proximal portion of the stomach and subsequent gastric emptying in horses.

Animals—6 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—The study consisted of 2 phases. In phase I, horses were offered a high-fat (8% fat) or a high-carbohydrate (3% fat) pelleted meal (0.5 g/kg) of identical volume, caloric density, and protein content. In phase II, meals consisted of a commercial sweet feed meal (0.5 g/kg) or this meal supplemented with corn oil (12.3% fat) or an isocaloric amount of glucose (2.9% fat). Proximal gastric tone was measured by variations in volume of an intragastric bag introduced through a gastric cannula and maintained with a constant internal pressure by an electronic barostat. Rate of gastric emptying was measured simultaneously with the 13C-octanoic acid breath test. Interaction between both techniques was studied in additional experiments.

Results—Meals with higher carbohydrate content induced a significantly more prolonged receptive relaxation of the proximal portion of the stomach than those with higher fat content, but the accommodation response was similar. Labeling the meals with the breath test marker influenced the accommodation response measured by the barostat. Gastric emptying rates were not significantly different between meals, although those high in carbohydrate initially emptied more slowly.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In horses, in contrast to most species, dietary fat supplementation may not have a profound effect on gastric motility. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:897–906)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research