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  • Author or Editor: E. J. Dubovi x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the frequency of viral detection in conjunctival samples from client-owned domestic dogs with naturally acquired idiopathic conjunctivitis and to identify signalment, historical, and clinical findings positively associated with viral detection.

Design—Case-control study

Animals—30 dogs with naturally acquired idiopathic conjunctivitis and a control population of 30 dogs without ocular disease.

Procedures—Complete physical and ophthalmic examinations were performed for each dog. Conjunctival swab specimens were analyzed by use of virus isolation and PCR assays for the following viruses: canine adenovirus-2 (CAV-2), canine distemper virus, canine herpesvirus-1 (CHV-1), canine parainfuenza virus, canine respiratory coronavirus, infuenza A virus, and West Nile virus. Signalment, clinical, and historical information was recorded and compared between study groups.

Results—Viruses were detected by either virus isolation or PCR methods significantly more frequently in conjunctival samples from dogs with conjunctivitis (7/30 [23.3%]) than dogs without conjunctivitis (0/30 [0%]). Canine herpesvirus-1 was isolated from 2 conjunctival samples and detected by use of PCR assay in 5 conjunctival samples. Canine adenovirus-2 was isolated from 1 conjunctival sample and detected by use of PCR assay in 2 conjunctiva samples. Sexually intact dogs and frequent exposure to dogs outside the household were positively associated with viral detection in the conjunctivitis group

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that CHV-1 and CAV-2 are common etiologic agents of conjunctivitis in domestic dogs. Risk factors for viral conjunctivitis in dogs reflected increased exposure to other dogs and opportunities for contact with infectious secretions.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

A retrospective study was designed to determine the distribution of equine monocytic ehrlichiosis among the equine population in New York state, and to identify factors associated with risk of disease. Serum samples submitted to the diagnostic laboratory of the university during the period from January 1985 through December 1986 were examined for antibodies to Ehrlichia risticii, using the indirect fluorescent antibody technique. Factors evaluated included geographic origin and date of submission of the sample, and age, breed, and sex of the horse. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify which factors were significantly associated with the risk of seropositivity to E risticii, while simultaneously controlling for other factors.

Of the 2,579 tested samples, 1,950 (76%) had positive results. Factors significantly associated with risk of seropositivity to E risticii were: breed of the horse (Thoroughbreds were 3 times more likely to have been exposed to E risticii, compared with non-Standardbred, non-Thoroughbred breeds); sex (female horses were 2.7 times more likely to have been exposed, compared with male horses); age of the horse (the risk of being exposed to E risticii increased with age, peaked at around 12 years, and decreased thereafter); and month of submission (horses tested during November and December had the highest odds of being seropositive [odds ratio = 2.1], and horses tested during March through April were least likely to be seropositive [odds ratio = 0.5], compared with horses tested during January and February).

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To estimate the seroprevalence of antibodies against H3N8 canine influenza virus (CIV) in a population of US dogs with influenza-like illness (ILI) and to identify factors associated with seropositivity.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—1,268 pet and shelter dogs with ILI in 42 states.

Procedures—Serum samples collected from dogs from 2005 through June 2009 were tested for H3N8 CIV antibodies with a hemagglutination inhibition assay. Intrinsic factors (age, breed, and sex), extrinsic factors (dogs housed in a shelter facility, boarding kennel, or other setting), and geographic region (southwest, west, Midwest, southeast, and northeast) were compared between seropositive and seronegative dogs to identify variables associated with seropositivity.

Results—Most (750/1,268 [59%]) dogs in the study were from Colorado, Florida, or New York. The overall seroprevalence of antibodies against H3N8 CIV was 49% (618/1,268 dogs; 95% confidence interval, 46% to 51%). The annual prevalence of H3N8 CIV seropositivity increased from 2005 (44%) to 2006 (53%) and 2007 (62%), then decreased in 2008 (38%) and 2009 (15%). The likelihood of H3N8 CIV seropositivity was associated with geographic region (southeast during 2005, west and northeast during 2006 and 2007, and northeast during 2008) and exposure setting (dogs housed in a shelter facility or boarding kennel during 2005 and 2006).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study suggested there is a need for continued surveillance for H3N8 CIV infection in dogs in the United States and that personnel in communal dog-housing facilities should formulate, implement, and evaluate biosecurity protocols to reduce the risk of CIV transmission among dogs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To compare the effect of a single parenteral injection of tilmicosin with that of a single dose of a long-acting oxytetracycline as treatment in the early stages of naturally acquired undifferentiated respiratory tract disease in young dairy calves.

Design

Prospective clinical trial, randomized block design.

Animals

40 dairy calves.

Procedure

78 calves from 5 farms were examined weekly until 3 months old. When respiratory tract disease was diagnosed by a veterinarian, the calf was assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups. Transtracheal wash samples were acquired to characterize the pathogens. The veterinarian, who was unaware of treatment assignments, examined calves for 3 days after treatment and evaluated severity, using a scoring system. Growth rates were measured.

Results

On the basis of response to initial treatment, relapse rates, and effect on growth rates, the antibiotics were determined to be equally effective. Severity of clinical disease was significantly (P < 0.03) less for the tilmicosin-treated calves on days 2 and 3 after treatment. Findings from analysis of transtracheal wash samples indicated Pasteurella multocida (25/40), P haemolytica (4/40), Haemophilus somnus (4/40), Actinomyces pyogenes (3/40), and Aspergillus sp (2/40). Mycoplasma was isolated in association with bacterial isolates in 22 calves.

Clinical Implications

Tilmicosin and oxytetracycline are effective in treatment of respiratory tract disease in young calves, even when Mycoplasma spp are involved. Tilmicosin is more effective in resolving clinical signs. Early treatment of dairy calves with respiratory tract disease may decrease detrimental effects on growth.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare antibody responses of horses naturally infected with West Nile virus (WNV) and those vaccinated against WNV, to identify whether vaccination interferes with the ability to diagnose WNV infection, and to determine the duration of antibody responses after vaccination.

SAMPLE Sera from horses naturally infected with WNV (n = 10) and adult WNV-naïve horses before and after vaccination with a live canarypox virus–vectored vaccine (7) or a killed virus vaccine (8).

PROCEDURES An established WNV IgM capture ELISA was used to measure IgM responses. Newly developed capture ELISAs were used to measure responses of 8 other WNV-specific immunoglobulin isotypes. A serum neutralization assay was used to determine anti-WNV antibody titers.

RESULTS WNV-specific IgM responses were typically detected in the sera of WNV-infected horses but not in sera of horses vaccinated against WNV. Natural infection with and vaccination against WNV induced an immunoglobulin response that was primarily composed of IgG1. West Nile virus–specific IgG1 was detected in the sera of most horses 14 days after vaccination. Serum anti-WNV IgG1 and neutralizing antibody responses induced by the killed-virus vaccines were higher and lasted longer than did those induced by the live canarypox virus–vectored vaccine.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE On the basis of these findings, we recommend that horses be vaccinated against WNV annually near the beginning of mosquito season, that both IgM and IgG1 responses against WNV be measured to distinguish between natural infection and vaccination, and that a WNV IgG1 ELISA be used to monitor anti-WNV antibodies titers in vaccinated horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives

To locate counties within New York state with a high seroprevalence among the equine population, to determine host, management, and environmental factors that were associated with seropositivity to Ehrlichia risticii, and to determine evidence for arthropod- or helminth-mediated transmission of E risticii to horses.

Design

Cross-sectional study.

Sample Population

A random sample of 3,000 of the 39,000 equine operations in New York state was selected, and 2,587 horses from 511 operations were tested.

Procedure

Blood samples were collected from horses and tested for seropositivity, using the indirect fluorescent antibody technique. Data on each horse and each farm's management were obtained by personal interview. The significance of each factor on the risk of seropositivity was evaluated, using mixed-effect logistic regression.

Results

The seroprevalence among E risticii-nonvaccinated horses was 7.3%. The county-specific seroprevalence ranged from 0 to 27%, with higher-risk counties located at low elevation. Farms at higher risk for having seropositive horses were located predominately at low elevation with no bodies of water nearby.

Risk of seropositivity was associated with time spent in a stall or run-in shed, with frequency of application of fly spray, and, depending on duration of residency at the farm, with frequency of deworming with benzimidazole and pyrantel. Standardbreds were 2 to 3 times more likely to have been exposed, compared with Thoroughbreds. Depending on duration of residency at the farm, male and middle-age horses were at higher risk.

Up to 32% of the variance for a horse to test seropositive for E risticii on the logit scale was attributable to farm-level random effects, but the nested social group random effect was not significant.

Conclusions

Arthropods and helminths may have a role in the transmission of this disease. Several management factors may directly or indirectly modify the risk of exposure to E risticii, allowing for the possibility of additional control measures besides traditional vaccination strategies.(Am J Vet Res 1996;57:278-285 )

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research