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  • Author or Editor: Dusty M. Nagy x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate several practice-adapted assays for determination of passive transfer status in crias.

Animals—24 llama and 9 alpaca crias.

Design—Prospective study.

Procedure—Serum IgG concentration was measured by use of a radial immunodiffusion assay when crias were 45 to 51 hours old. Results were compared with serum γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity, serum total protein, albumin, globulin, and total solids concentrations, and results of commercially available and traditional sodium sulfite turbidity (SST) tests.

Results—Mean (± SD) serum IgG concentration was 1,762 ± 1,153 mg/dl. On the basis of a threshold value of 1,000 mg of IgG/dl at 48 hours of age, 5 of 33 (15.15%) crias had failure of passive transfer. Serum total solids, protein, and globulin concentrations were significantly associated with serum IgG concentration, whereas serum GGT activity and serum albumin concentration were not. Serum IgG concentrations were significantly different among crias with negative, 2+, and 3+ scores on the traditional SST test. Serum IgG concentrations were not significantly different between crias with negative and 100 mg/dl scores or 100 and 300 mg/dl scores on the commercially available SST test. However, all other comparisons between crias with different scores revealed significant differences. Sensitivity and specificity ranged between 0 and 1, depending on the test and endpoint selected.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—The commercially available SST test and determination of serum total protein and globulin concentrations are suitable methods for assessing passive transfer status in llama and alpaca crias. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216:559–563)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine sensitivity and specificity of a cow-side immunoassay kit for assessing IgG concentration in colostrum.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—76 dairy and 11 beef cows of various parities.

Procedure—Colostrum from first, second, and third milkings and milk samples were collected, and IgG concentration was determined by means of radial immunodiffusion. The immunoassay was performed according to the manufacturer’s instructions, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated by comparing results of the immunoassay (positive vs negative) with results of immunodiffusion (< 50 g/L vs ≥ 50 g/L).

Results—135 colostrum or milk samples were collected. Mean ± SD colostral IgG concentrations, determined by means of radial immunodiffusion for dairy and beef cows were 65.4 ± 51.4 g/L and 114.8 ± 42.7 g/L, respectively. Mean IgG concentrations for first-, second-, and third-milking colostrum samples and for milk samples were 92 ± 49.0 g/L, 74.6 ± 45.1 g/L, 47.5 ± 32 g/L, and 6.8 ± 3.8 g/L, respectively. Sensitivity of the immunoassay (ie, percentage of samples with IgG concentration < 50 g/L with a positive immunoassay result) was 93%, and specificity (ie, percentage of samples with IgG concentration ± 50 g/L with a negative immunoassay result) was 76%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that the immunoassay kit was an acceptable cow-side test to identify colostrum samples with IgG concentrations < 50 g/L. The immunoassay kit should be useful in screening colostrum for adequate IgG concentration before feeding to calves or storage. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:129–131)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association