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Abstract

Objective—To determine reference values, intertest correlations, and test-retest repeatability of Schirmer tear test 1 (STT-1), phenol red thread test (PRTT), tear film breakup time (TFBUT), tear osmolarity, and meibometry in healthy cats.

Design—Evaluation study.

Animals—135 healthy domestic cats aged 0.5 to 12.8 years.

Procedures—Each test was performed once in 120 cats and repeated in 40. Pearson correlation was used to assess correlation among tests. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) were used to evaluate test-retest repeatability.

Results—Median (95% central range) values were 18 mm/min (9 to 34 mm/min) for STT-1, 29 mm/15 s (15 to 37 mm/15 s) for PRTT, 12.4 seconds (9.1 to 17.7 seconds) for TFBUT, 322 mOsm/L (297 to 364 mOsm/L) for osmolarity, and 32 meibometry units (MU; 11 to 114 MU) for peak meibometry value. The STT-1 and PRTT values were positively correlated. Age was weakly associated with TFBUT and osmolarity. Meibometry measurements were higher for strips that contacted the tear film (285 MU) than for those that touched the eyelid margin only (32 MU). All ICCs were < 0.75, and 95% LOA were wide.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tear deficiency should be suspected in cats with STT-1 < 9 mm/min, PRTT < 15 mm/15 s, or TFBUT < 9 to 10 seconds. Generally poor correlation among tests suggested that thorough tear film analysis requires performance of multiple tests in concert. Relatively poor test-retest repeatability should be considered when repeated tests are used to monitor tear film dysfunction and response to treatment.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare detection rates of feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1) DNA in skin biopsy specimens from cats with herpetic dermatitis, cats with nonherpetic dermatitis, and cats without dermatitis.

Design—Prevalence survey.

Animals—5 cats (9 biopsy specimens) with herpetic ulcerative dermatitis, 14 cats (17 biopsy specimens) with nonherpetic ulcerative dermatitis, and 8 cats (21 biopsy specimens) without clinically apparent skin lesions.

Procedures—A single-phase PCR assay was used to detect FHV-1 DNA in biopsy specimens. Assay results were compared with results of histologic examination.

Results—FHV-1 DNA was detected in all 9 biopsy specimens from the 5 cats with herpetic dermatitis and in 1 of 17 biopsy specimens from the 14 cats with nonherpetic dermatitis, but was not detected in any of the 21 biopsy specimens from the 8 cats without dermatitis. When results of histologic examination were used as the gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of the PCR assay were 100% and 95%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results confirmed that FHV-1 DNA can be detected in the skin of cats with herpetic dermatitis and suggest that the virus may play a causative role in the disease. In addition, the PCR assay may be useful in confirming a diagnosis of herpetic dermatitis.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVES To determine, following oral administration of famciclovir, pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters for 2 of its metabolites (penciclovir and BRL42359) in plasma and tears of healthy cats so that famciclovir dosage recommendations for the treatment of herpetic disease can be optimized.

ANIMALS 7 male domestic shorthair cats.

PROCEDURES In a crossover study, each of 3 doses of famciclovir (30, 40, or 90 mg/kg) was administered every 8 or 12 hours for 3 days. Six cats were randomly assigned to each dosage regimen. Plasma and tear samples were obtained at predetermined times after famciclovir administration. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for BRL42359 and penciclovir by compartmental and noncompartmental methods. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) indices were determined for penciclovir and compared among all dosage regimens.

RESULTS Compared with penciclovir concentrations, BRL42359 concentrations were 5- to 11-fold greater in plasma and 4- to 7-fold greater in tears. Pharmacokinetic parameters and PK-PD indices for the 90 mg/kg regimens were superior to those for the 30 and 40 mg/kg regimens, regardless of dosing frequency. Penciclovir concentrations in tears ranged from 18% to 25% of those in plasma. Administration of 30 or 40 mg/kg every 8 hours achieved penciclovir concentrations likely to be therapeutic in plasma but not in tears. Penciclovir concentrations likely to be therapeutic in tears were achieved only with the two 90 mg/kg regimens.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In cats, famciclovir absorption is variable and its metabolism saturable. Conversion of BRL42359 to penciclovir is rate limiting. The recommended dosage of famciclovir is 90 mg/kg every 12 hours for cats infected with feline herpesvirus.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To correlate gene transcription of cytokines and chemokines with histologic inflammation in nasal biopsy specimens of cats.

Animals—25 study cats and 4 specific pathogen–free cats.

Procedure—One nasal biopsy specimen from each cat was submitted for routine histologic evaluation; a second was submitted for evaluation by use of a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis with a fluorogenic probe (ie, TaqMan) for detection of cytokines and chemokines (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 p40, IL-16, IL-18, interferon [IFN]-γ, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, and the regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES] protein). Specimens were grouped histologically by degree of inflammation (none, mild, moderate, or severe). Linearized TaqMan signals for each gene were compared among histologic groups.

Results—Nasal biopsy specimens from specific pathogen–free cats were histologically normal, and cytokine transcription was low in these samples. As nasal inflammation in study cats worsened from absent (n = 3) to mild (4) to moderate (8) or severe (10), progressively and significantly increasing transcription of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 p40, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and the RANTES protein was detected. Transcription of IL-4, IL- 5, IL-16, and IL-18 did not correlate with worsened histologic inflammation.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Transcription of specific cytokines and chemokines in nasal tissue of cats progressively increased with severity of histologic evidence of inflammation, and IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 p40, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and the RANTES protein were markers of inflammation. Our data suggest that the nasal cavity of cats is biased toward a Th1 cytokine profile that is augmented by inflammation. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:996–1001)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research