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  • Author or Editor: Donald H. Schlafer x
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History

During its first pregnancy, a 9-year-old Pinto mare aborted a male fetus at a gestational age of approximately 8.5 months. The mare had contact with a gelding that had no clinical signs of disease. The vaccination status of each horse was current; the horses had received a tetanus toxoid vaccine and vaccines against rabies virus, West Nile virus, eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses, equine herpesviruses 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), and equine influenza virus.

Clinical and Gross Findings

Prior to abortion, the mare had a rectal temperature of 34.7°C (94.5°F) and was pawing at the ground. Auscultation

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence of various lesion types detected by histologic evaluation of uterine biopsy samples collected from subfertile bitches.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—399 sexually intact bitches.

Procedures—Results of histologic evaluation of canine uterine biopsy samples submitted by a single veterinary practice and clinical histories of dogs from which samples were obtained were reviewed. Clinical data including age, reason for biopsy, and histopathologic findings were recorded. The prevalence of specific lesions was determined, categorized by severity and age, and statistically analyzed.

Results—Endometritis (170/399 [42.6%] cases) and cystic endometrial changes, including cystic endometrial hyperplasia (133/399 [33.3%]) were the most prevalent lesions in the study population. Eighty-nine of 170 (52.4%) cases of endometritis were characterized as chronic with predominantly lymphocytic or lymphoplasmacytic inflammatory infiltrates, 51 (30.0%) included mixed inflammatory reactions, and 30 (17.6%) were characterized as having acute inflammation with neutrophils, eosinophils, or both. Fibrosis was common (101/399 [25.3%] cases). Eosinophilic endometritis was significantly associated with a history of fetal loss during the same breeding cycle. No significant difference was found in prevalence of lesions among age groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The high prevalence of endometritis in this population of dogs suggested that acute and chronic endometritis may be related to subfertility in bitches. The association of eosinophilic endometrial infiltrates with a history of fetal loss may be an important diagnostic finding in dogs with endometritis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 2-year-old 454.5-kg (1,000-lb) Saddlebred stallion was admitted to the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital for castration. Three days prior to admission, the referring veterinarian attempted to castrate the horse. The left testis was undescended and in an abdominal location. Surgery via an inguinal approach did not enable the veterinarian to locate the testis. Therefore, the veterinarian did not remove the contralateral right testis, which was located in the scrotum, and the stallion was referred to our facility for evaluation and subsequent removal of both testes.

Results of physical examination and initial hematologic analysis of the stallion conducted

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 6-year-old Arabian mare was bred by a stallion 2 times with an interval of 2 days between breedings. Transrectal ultrasonography performed 21 days after the second breeding revealed a single embryonic vesicle (30 mm in diameter) at the base of the left uterine horn. The mare subsequently gave birth to a healthy male foal 351 days after the second breeding.

Fetal membranes were expelled approximately 1 hour after parturition. The fetal membranes were examined the following day to ensure they were complete (ie, all membranes had been expelled) and for evidence of abnormalities. During evaluation of the fetal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 2-year-old castrated male Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) was evaluated at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals because of a rapidly growing mass located in the cranial aspect of the left axillary region. According to the owner, the rat appeared normal 3 days before but had since developed signs of depression and become inappetent. At initial evaluation, the rat had non–weight-bearing lameness of the left thoracic limb.

Clinical and Gross Findings

On clinical examination, there was a 2.5 × 3 × 3-cm firm nodular subcutaneous mass within the cranial aspect of the left axillary region that was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association