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SUMMARY

Transcutaneous pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography was used to obtain velocity signals from the aortic and pulmonary roots of clinically normal adult dogs tranquilized with acepromazine. Doppler-derived variables included peak ejection velocity, ejection time, and velocity-time integral. The cross-sectional areas of the left and right ventricular outflow tracts were estimated from diameters of the respective orifices measured from two-dimensional echocardiographic images. These data were used to calculate stroke volume and cardiac output for each ventricle. Linear, single variable regressions of ejection time, velocity-time integral, and peak velocity with body weight showed no significant correlations. Significant correlations existed between body weight and estimated left and right ventricular stroke volume and cardiac output. A close correspondence existed between pulmonary and aortic determinations of velocity-time integral, stroke volume, and cardiac output. These results provide an initial framework for interpretation of clinical data by veterinary cardiologists.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine duration of administration, complications, and frequency of aortic thromboembolism associated with administration of low molecular weight heparin (dalteparin) in cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—57 cats treated with dalteparin.

Procedure—Data were recorded from the medical records of cats treated with dalteparin, and owners were contacted by telephone for information regarding ease of administration and possible adverse effects.

Results—Dalteparin was easily administered by owners. Median dose was 99 U/kg (45 U/lb) once or twice daily. Bleeding complications were infrequent. Of 43 cats with cardiomyopathy that received owner-administered dalteparin for a median follow-up time of 172 days, 8 cats developed documented or possible arterial thromboembolism.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dalteparin was easily administered by owners and was well tolerated by cats. Whether dalteparin administration can reduce the frequency or severity of arterial thromboembolism is not yet known. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1237–1241)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine current population characteristics of, clinical findings in, and survival times for cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM).

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—260 cats with HCM.

Procedure—Information was obtained from the medical records. Cats were classified into 1 of 4 clinical groups (congestive heart failure [CHF] group, arterial thromboembolism [ATE] group, syncope group, or cats without clinical signs [subclinical group]) on the basis of the primary clinical signs at the initial examination.

Results—120 cats were classified in the CHF group, 43 in the ATE group, 10 in the syncope group, and 87 in the subclinical group. Antecedent events that may have precipitated CHF included IV fluid administration, anesthesia, surgery, and recent corticosteroid administration. Median survival time was 709 days (range, 2 to 4,418 days) for cats that survived > 24 hours. Cats in the subclinical group lived the longest (median survival time, 1,129 days; range, 2 to 3,778 days), followed by cats in the syncope group (654 days; range, 28 to 1,505 days), cats in the CHF group (563 days; range, 2 to 4,418 days), and cats in the ATE group (184 days; range, 2 to 2,278 days). Causes of death included ATE (n = 56), CHF (49), sudden death (13), and noncardiac causes (27). In univariate analyses, survival time was negatively correlated with left atrial size, age, right ventricular enlargement, and thoracentesis. Cats with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve lived longer than cats without this echocardiographic finding. In multivariate analyses, only age and left atrial size remained significant predictors of survival time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although overall survival time for cats with HCM was similar to earlier reports, survival times for cats with CHF or ATE were longer than previously reported. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:202–207)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To evaluate response to chemotherapy in cats with alimentary lymphoma and to determine factors associated with survival time.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

28 cats with alimentary lymphoma that underwent chemotherapy.

Results

In all cats, the diagnosis had been established by means of cytologic or histologic examination of ultrasound-guided aspirates and biopsy specimens (18 cats), histologic examination of surgically obtained biopsy specimens (7 cats), or examination of specimens obtained endoscopically (3 cats). Clinical signs included anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, and diarrhea. Twenty-seven cats were treated with vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone; 1 was treated with chlorambucil and prednisone. Survival time ranged from 2 to 2,120 days (median, 50 days). Nine cats achieved complete remission (remission time ranged from 30 to 1,700 days; median, 213 days), 2 achieved partial remission, and 17 failed to respond to chemotherapy. Sex, FeLV status, hematocrit, serum total protein concentration, site and extent of gastrointestinal involvement, and clinical stage were not found to be associated with survival time.

Clinical Implications

Cats with alimentary lymphoma are poorly responsive to treatment with vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone; however, a small subset of cats may have long survival times.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical characteristics and clinicopathologic findings, including results of pericardial fluid analysis, and determine the outcome associated with pericardial effusion caused by cardiac lymphoma in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—12 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records of affected dogs were reviewed for echocardiographic findings, radiographic findings, results of pericardial fluid analysis, clinicopathologic findings, treatment protocols, and outcomes.

Results—Pericardial effusion was detected by echocardiography in all 12 dogs, and lymphoma was detected by cytologic examination of the effusion (11/12 dogs) or histologic examination of pericardium (3/12). Large-breed dogs were overrepresented; median weight was 40.5 kg (89.1 lb). Most hematologic and biochemical changes were mild and nonspecific. Survival time for dogs treated with combination chemotherapeutic agents was 157 days and for dogs that did not receive chemotherapy survival time was 22 days. This difference was not significant, but several dogs had long-term survival.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cardiac lymphoma is an uncommon cause of pericardial effusion, and results suggest that cardiac lymphoma does not always warrant the poor prognosis of other stage V, substage b lymphomas. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005; 227:1449–1453)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To describe the historical, clinical, and echocardiographic findings in Dalmatians with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM).

Design

Retrospective case series.

Sample Population

9 Dalmatians with a diagnosis of DCM and congestive heart failure (CHF), 9 Doberman Pinschers with DCM and CHF, and 9 dogs of other breeds with DCM and CHF.

Procedure

Disease history; signalment; physical, radiographic, and echocardiographic examination findings; treatment; and outcome from medical records were analyzed.

Results

All Dalmatians were male, with a mean age of 6.8 years. Eight dogs had been fed a commercially available low-protein diet formulated for the prevention of urate uroliths. All dogs had clinical signs consistent with left-sided CHF and had marked left ventricular systolic dysfunction and severe left ventricular dilatation, although arrhythmias were not an important finding in this series of dogs. Median duration of survival was 10 months.

Clinical Implications

The DCM syndrome in Dalmatians has some qualities that are distinct from DCM in other breeds of dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:1592–1596)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Dispositions of caffeine and antipyrine were compared as indicators of decreasing hepatic function in dogs with experimentally induced progressive liver disease. Dimethylnitrosamine, a hepatospecific toxin, was administered orally to 16 dogs; 6 dogs served as controls (group 1). Three classes of liver disease were defined by histologic features: mild (group 2; n = 5), moderate (group 3; n = 6), and severe (group 4; n = 5). Disposition of antipyrine, and 24 hours later, caffeine was studied 3 weeks after the last dose of toxin in each dog. For both drugs, rapid IV administration of 20 mg/kg of body weight was administered and serum samples were obtained at intervals for determination of at least 5 terminal-phase drug half-lives. For both drugs, clearance and mean residence time differed among groups (P ≤ 0.01). Clearance of antipyrine and caffeine was decreased in groups 3 and 4, compared with groups 1 and 2. Antipyrine and caffeine mean residence times were longer in group-3 dogs, compared with dogs of groups 1 and 2. Correction of caffeine and antipyrine clearances for hepatic weight increased discrimination between groups 3 and 4. The clearance and mean residence time ratios of antipyrine to caffeine were calculated for each group and, when compared with values for group-1 dogs, were used to test for differences between the 2 drugs in response to disease. Ratios did not differ among groups. These results indicate that the disposition of antipyrine and caffeine may change similarly with progression of dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver disease.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Leukocytosis (34,600 wbc/μl of blood) was detected in an apparently healthy 7-day-old Holstein heifer. Analysis of blood samples obtained over the next 41 days revealed chronic progressive neutrophilia, which peaked at > 85% neutrophils and exceeded 100,000 wbc/μl. In vitro assessment of isolated blood neutrophils obtained from the heifer at 38 and 45 days of age revealed selected functional abnormalities. Endocytosis of immunoglobulin-opsonized Staphylococcus aureus and killing of this test organism by the calf’s neutrophils were significantly diminished, as were phagocytosis-associated superoxide generation, chemiluminescence activity, and myeloperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. Diminished H2O2 elaboration by the calf’s neutrophils was evident during ingestion of opsonized zymosan or on exposure to phorbol myristate acetate. Extracellular release (secretion) of elastase during ingestion of zymosan was also diminished, although total cell content of elastase was normal, compared with that of neutrophils from age-matched calves, and granular or other morphologic abnormalities of the calf’s neutrophils were not evident by ultrastructural examination. Abnormalities of random migration were inconsistently detected, and normal or high degree of antibody-dependent cytotoxicity or natural killing by the calf’s neutrophils was observed. Similar in vitro assessment of neutrophils obtained from the calf’s dam revealed no functional abnormalities. The calf died at 48 days of age, with persistent fever and chronic diarrhea, despite administration of antibiotics. Histologic examination at necropsy revealed large numbers of intravascular neutrophils in most tissues, including massive neutrophil sequestration in spleen. However, a striking lack of extravascular neutrophils was evident in inflamed submucosa adjacent to intestinal ulcers heavily contaminated with enteric microorganisms. Bone marrow examination revealed diffuse myeloid hyperplasia, but no other abnormalities.

The clinical and pathologic features in this calf were similar to those in previously reported human patients or Irish Setters with genetic deficiency of the CD11/CD18 leukocyte glycoprotein complex, thus prompting further postmortem evaluations. Results of immunoblot analyses of the neutrophil lysates of the heifer calf (isolated and stored prior to death) documented severe deficiency of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18). Results of immunofluorescent analyses indicated substantially diminished (intermediate) amounts ofthe Mac-1 β subunit (CD18) on blood neutrophils of the calf's dam and sire and on neutrophils of 8 of 15 paternal half-siblings; findings were consistent with an autosomal recessive trait in the proband's kindred. Findings also indicate that genetic abnormalities of CD11/CD18 proteins may underlie the molecular pathogenesis of disease in this calf as well as other previously described examples of the granulocytopathy syndrome in Holstein cattle.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research