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  • Author or Editor: Dominick Valenzano x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the dome trochleoplasty procedure and report the short-term outcomes and complications associated with a novel technique to correct patellar luxation and patella alta.

ANIMALS

13 dogs (16 stifle joints) diagnosed with medial patellar luxation with concurrent patella alta in dogs > 20 kg.

CLINICAL PRESENTATION

Medical records of dogs weighing > 20 kg that underwent a dome trochleoplasty for correction of a medial luxating patella were prospectively evaluated. The procedure described involves an osteotomy of the femoral trochlea, which is then translated and/or rotated to correct patellar luxation. Clinical results were assessed using subjective lameness scoring, radiographic evaluation, and the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI) tool.

RESULTS

16 stifle joints were included in this study. The overall complication rate was 50%. Major complications occurred in 43.8% of stifle joints due to pin migration and recurrent luxation of the patella. One dog experienced a catastrophic complication 4 months postoperatively. Uncomplicated osteotomy healing was present in 94% of dogs. The median initial lameness score was 2 (mean, 1.81; range, 0 to 4) and at the final recheck was 0 (mean, 0.31; range, 0 to 2). The CBPI scores were available for 50% of stifle joints. The median initial CBPI score was 45.5 (mean, 48.8; range, 32 to 74) and at the final recheck was 17.5 (mean, 20.5; range, 0 to 43).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The dome trochleoplasty procedure offers an alternative technique for surgical correction of patellar luxation secondary to patella alta in large-breed dogs, but due to its higher complication and reluxation rates, it should be used cautiously and probably in combination with other corrective procedures, such as tibial tuberosity transposition, soft tissue imbrication, and/or soft tissue release rather than as a stand-alone procedure.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association