Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Derek P. Burney x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objectives

To develop Toxoplasma gondii B1 gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for use with aqueous humor of cats, and to report PCR and antibody detection results in naturally exposed cats with and without uveitis.

Sample Population

Serum and aqueous humor samples from client-owned, healthy cats (n = 23) and client-owned cats with uveitis (n = 43).

Procedure

T gondii-specific IgM and IgG were measured in serum and aqueous humor from all cats. The Goldman-Witmer coefficient for ocular antibody production was calculated for cats positive for T gondii-specific IgM or IgG in aqueous humor. Aqueous humor from all cats was assessed by the B1 gene PCR.

Results

T gondii was detected in aqueous humor by PCR from 2 of 23 (8.7%) healthy cats and 8 of 43 (18.6%) cats with uveitis. T gondii-specific IgM in either serum or aqueous humor was detected in 5 of 8 (62.5%) cats with uveitis and T gondii in aqueous humor. All cats with uveitis and T gondii in aqueous humor had anterior segment disease. In 5 of 8 (62.5%) cats with uveitis and T gondii in aqueous humor, ocular production of T gondii antibodies was not detected. T gondii was not detected in aqueous humor from 14 of 17 (82.4%) cats with ocular production of T gondii-specific antibody.

Conclusions

The presence of T gondii in aqueous humor may correlate to clinical disease in some, but not all, cats.

Clinical Relevance

T gondii-specific aqueous humor antibody tests and PCR should be used together to aid in the diagnosis of ocular toxoplasmosis in cats. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:1589–1593)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgA, IgM, and IgG were measured by ELISA in the serum and aqueous humor of 29 client-owned cats with endogenous uveitis and 7 specific-pathogen-free cats tested sequentially for 20 weeks after inoculation with T gondii. Local antibody production in aqueous humor was estimated by multiplying the aqueous humor-to-serum T gondii-specific antibody ratio by the serum-to- aqueous humor total IgG (C value) or calicivirus-spe- cific IgG (CTC value) ratio. Evidence for local production of antibody in aqueous humor was defined as C value greater than 8 or CTC value greater than 1. Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgM CTC values, IgG CTC values, or IgA CTC values greater than 1 were detected in the aqueous humor of 18 of 29 (62.1%) client- owned cats with endogenous uveitis; 2 cats had IgA CTC values greater than 1 without detectable IgM or IgG in aqueous humor. Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgM was not detected in the aqueous humor of experimentally inoculated cats before or after inoculation. Immunoglobulin G C values greater than 8 were detected in all 7 experimentally inoculated cats and ranged from 10.4 to 145.5.

Immunoglobulin G C values greater than 8 were first detected 4 to 8 weeks after T gondii inoculation and were undetectable by week 16 after inoculation. Immunoglobulin A C values greater than 8 were detected in 4 of 7 cats and ranged from 12.7 to 264.3. Immunoglobulin A C values greater than 8 were first detected 4 to 8 weeks after inoculation, and were detected in 2 cats during week 20 after inoculation. It was concluded that some cats infected with T gondii develop detectable concentrations of T gondii-specific IgA in aqueous humor.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

An elisa for detection of Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgA in feline serum was developed. A group of cats (n = 7) was inoculated orally with T gondii bradyzoites. Toxoplasma gondii-specific serum IgM, IgG, and IgA responses were followed sequentially by use of the ELISA for 34 weeks. Serum IgA was detected later than IgM or IgG, and was detected in most cats on week 34 after inoculation. None of the cats was seropositive for IgA during the oocyst-shedding period. A group of client-owned cats with suspected clinical toxoplasmosis and a group of healthy cats were tested for Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgA in serum. A trend toward association of T gondii-specific IgA in serum of cats with ocular disease was observed.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research