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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Microscopic anatomy of the horizontal part of the external ear canal was evaluated in 24 dogs. Sixteen dogs were from breeds known to have a predisposition to otitis externa. The remaining 8 dogs were from breeds that do not have a predisposition to otitis externa. Dogs were separated into groups according to predisposition to otitis externa: group 1—predisposed dogs without otic inflammation, group 2—predisposed dogs with otic inflammation, and group 3—nonpredisposed dogs without otic inflammation.

Qualitative microscopic evaluation of distribution of hair follicles revealed hair within proximal, middle, and distal regions of the horizontal ear canal in all breeds. The degree of keratinization was directly proportional to the presence of otic inflammation and was excessive in group-2 dogs.

Quality of sebaceous glands within the horizontal ear canal was similar among dogs with and without otitis externa, whereas the quantity of apocrine tubular glands was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in dogs with otitis. Quantity of apocrine tubular glands was also greater in group-1 dogs than in group-3 dogs.

Thickness of the soft tissue in the external ear canal increased in direct proportion to the progression of disease and was greatest in the proximal region of the affected ear canal. Soft tissue located caudally between nonopposing ends of the annular cartilage, within the proximal region of the horizontal ear canal, contained few glands and hair follicles in dogs without otitis externa. In dogs with otitis externa, this region was infiltrated by distended apocrine tubular glands.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare use of doxorubicin, surgery, and radiation versus surgery and radiation alone for treatment of cats with vaccine-associated sarcoma.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—25 cats with vaccine-associated sarcomas.

Procedure—Time to first recurrence and survival time were compared between the 2 treatment groups. The number of surgeries (1 or > 1) were compared with respect to time to first recurrence and survival time.

Results—Median time to first recurrence was 661 days for the group that received doxorubicin, surgery, and radiation. Median time to first recurrence has not yet been attained for the group treated with surgery and radiation alone. Median survival time was 674 days for the group treated with doxorubicin, surgery, and radiation and 842 days for the group treated with surgery and radiation alone. For time to first recurrence and survival time, significant differences were not detected between cats that had 1 surgery and those that had > 1 surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Significant differences between the 2 treatment groups were not detected. The efficacy of doxorubicin in the treatment of vaccine-associated sarcomas is uncertain. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:547–550)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association