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Abstract

Case Description—A 3-year-old female domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with an insulinoma was treated because of a hypoglycemic crisis prior to scheduled pancreatectomy with concurrent nodulectomy.

Clinical Findings—Previously, the ferret had clinical signs of lethargy and hind limb weakness; at that time, blood glucose concentration was low, and a tentative diagnosis (subsequently confirmed) of insulinoma was made. Prednisolone treatment (0.3 mg/kg [0.14 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h) did not improve clinical signs; the dosage was gradually increased over a 1-month course (1.8 mg/kg [0.82 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h) and maintained for 10 days. Overall, the treatment was ineffective, and the ferret remained lethargic and developed inappetence. At a reevaluation, the ferret had severe weakness and nonresponsiveness nearing a comatose state. Standard treatment with dextrose (1 mL of 50% solution, IV), and dexamethasone (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], SC) was administered with resultant improvement in mentation. The ferret was discharged from the hospital and then returned 3 days later for stabilization prior to pancreatectomy with concurrent nodulectomy.

Treatment and Outcome—The day before surgery, the ferret was administered a glucagon constant rate infusion at a rate of 15 ng/kg/min (6.8 ng/lb/min), which resulted in an increase in blood glucose concentration to a euglycemic state and resolution of clinical signs of hypoglycemia.

Clinical Relevance—As illustrated by the case described in this report, a glucagon constant rate infusion can be used successfully for the emergency treatment of hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic crisis in insulinomic ferrets.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 4-year-old nulliparous sexually intact female chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) was evaluated because of a 2-month history of blood being sporadically observed in its cage.

Clinical Findings—Results of physical examination of the chinchilla were unremarkable except for the presence of blood-stained fur around the perineum. There were no external lesions to account for the bleeding. Findings on urinalysis, bacteriologic culture of urine, and whole-body radiography were unremarkable. The chinchilla's littermate had been evaluated because of similar clinical signs 2 years earlier, and these signs resolved following ovariohysterectomy.

Treatment and Outcome—Ovariohysterectomy was performed, and gross changes were not observed in the reproductive tract. However, microscopic examination revealed multifocal cystic dilation of the endometrial glands, foci of microhemorrhage, and chronic suppurative inflammation consistent with a final diagnosis of cystic endometrial hyperplasia and chronic endometritis. Clinical signs did not recur.

Clinical Relevance—Cystic endometrial hyperplasia has been documented in a variety of animals, but to the authors' knowledge, this was the first reported case in a chinchilla. Cystic endometrial hyperplasia and chronic endometritis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in an adult sexually intact female chinchilla with a history of suspected hemorrhagic vaginal discharge, suspected hematuria, or hemorrhage from an unknown source.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association