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  • Author or Editor: Denise A. Elliott x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate complications and outcomes associated with use of gastrostomy tubes in dogs with renal failure.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—56 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed for dogs with renal failure that were treated by use of gastrostomy tubes.

Results—Mean ± SD BUN concentration was 134 ± 79 mg/dl and mean serum creatinine concentration was 9.0 ± 3.8 mg/dl. Low-profile gastrostomy tubes were used for initial placement in 10 dogs, and traditional gastrostomy tubes were used in 46 dogs. Mild stoma-site complications included discharge, swelling, erythema, and signs of pain in 26 (46%) of dogs. Twenty-six gastrostomy tubes were replaced in 15 dogs; 11 were replaced because of patient removal, 6 were replaced because of tube wear, and 3 were replaced for other reasons. Six tubes were replaced by low-profile gastrostomy tubes. Gastrostomy tubes were used for 65 ± 91 days (range, 1 to 438 days). Eight dogs gained weight, 11 did not change weight, and 17 lost weight; information was not available for 20 dogs. Three dogs were euthanatized because they removed their gastrostomy tubes, 2 were euthanatized because of evidence of tube migration, and 1 died of peritonitis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Gastrostomy tubes appear to be safe and effective for improving nutritional status of dogs with renal failure. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:1337–1342)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the reliability of history and physical examination findings for assessing control of glycemia in insulin-treated diabetic dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—53 insulin-treated dogs with diabetes mellitus.

Procedure—Medical records of insulin-treated diabetic dogs from June 1995 to June 1998 were reviewed, and information on owner perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings, body weight, insulin dosage, and concentrations of food-withheld (ie, fasting) blood glucose (FBG), mean blood glucose (MBG) during an 8-hour period, blood glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), and serum fructosamine was obtained. Owner's perception of their dog's response to insulin treatment, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight were used to classify control of glycemia as good or poor for each dog. The FBG, MBG/8 h, blood GHb, and serum fructosamine concentrations were compared between well-controlled and poorly controlled insulin-treated diabetic dogs.

Results—Presence or absence of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, lethargy, and weakness were most helpful in classifying control of glycemia. Mean FBG and MBG/8 h concentrations, blood GHb concentrations, and serum fructosamine concentrations were significantly decreased in 25 well-controlled diabetic dogs, compared with 28 poorly controlled diabetic dogs. Most well-controlled diabetic dogs had concentrations of FBG between 100 and 300 mg/dl, MBG/8 h ≤ 250 mg/dl, blood GHb ≤ 7.5%, and serum fructosamine ≤ 525 µmol/L, whereas most poorly controlled diabetic dogs had results that were greater than these values.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Reliance on history, physical examination findings, and changes in body weight are effective for initially assessing control of glycemia in insulin-treated diabetic dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:48–53)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (MF-BIA) for estimating total body water (TBW), extracellular fluid volume (ECFV), and intracellular fluid volume (ICFV) in horses.

Animals—9 healthy mares.

Procedure—TBW and ECFV were measured by use of deuterium oxide and sodium bromide dilution techniques, respectively. Intracellular fluid volume was calculated as the difference between TBW and ECFV. Concurrently, MF-BIA recordings were obtained by use of 4 anatomic electrode positions and 3 measurements of length. Models for MF-BIA data were created for all combinations of length and anatomic electrode position. Models were evaluated to determine the position-length configuration that provided the most consistent estimates of TBW, ECFV, and ICFV, compared with values determined by use of the dilution techniques.

Results—Positioning electrodes over the ipsilateral carpus and tarsus and use of height at the tuber sacrale for length provided the closest estimate between values for TBW, ECFV, and ICFV predicted by use of MF-BIA and measured values obtained by dilutional techniques. This model had the narrowest 95% limits of agreement.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—MF-BIA techniques have been used to predict changes in TBW, ECFV, and ICFV in healthy and diseased humans. Results reported in this study provide an equine-specific model to serve as the basis for further evaluation of MF-BIA in horses with altered fluid states. The MF-BIA techniques have a number of potential applications for use in horses, including evaluation of exercise physiology, pharmacologic studies, and critical-care management. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:320–326)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize the effect of maintenance hemodialysis on plasma amino acid concentrations and to quantitate free amino acid losses into the dialysate during hemodialysis in healthy dogs.

Animals—8 healthy adult dogs.

Procedure—Five dogs received hemodialysis treatments 3 times per week for 4 weeks. Plasma amino acid concentrations were evaluated once per week for 4 weeks in each of the 5 dogs prior to hemodialysis (time 0), 90 minutes during hemodialysis, and immediately after hemodialysis (180 minutes). Total free amino acid concentrations and plasma amino acid concentrations (time 0, 90 minutes, and 180 minutes) in the dialysate were evaluated in 3 dogs that received 1 hemodialysis treatment.

Results—Significant time versus week interactions with any plasma amino acid were not detected; however, significant decreases in all plasma amino acid concentrations measured were detected at the midpoint of dialysis (46 ± 2%) and at the end of each dialysis session (38 ± 2%). Mean (± SEM) total free amino acid loss into the dialysate was 2.7 ± 0.2 g or 0.12 g/kg of body weight.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hemodialysis is associated with significant alterations in plasma amino acid concentrations and loss of free amino acids into the dialysate. Loss of amino acids into the dialysate, coupled with protein calorie malnutrition in uremic patients, may contribute to depletion of amino acid stores.(Am J Vet Res 2000;61:869–873)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence of pituitary tumors, detectable by means of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, in cats with insulin resistance suspected to have acromegaly or hyperadrenocorticism versus cats with well-controlled diabetes mellitus.

Design—Case series.

Animals—16 cats with insulin resistance that were also suspected to have acromegaly (n = 12) or pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (4) and 8 cats with well-controlled diabetes mellitus.

Procedure—Computed tomography was performed on all 16 cats with insulin resistance and 2 cats in which diabetes mellitus was well-controlled. The remaining 6 cats in which diabetes mellitus was wellcontrolled underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Images were obtained before and immediately after IV administration of contrast medium.

Results—Computed tomography revealed a mass in the region of the pituitary gland in all 16 cats with insulin resistance. Maximum width of the masses ranged from 4.4 to 12.7 mm; maximum height ranged from 3.1 to 12.6 mm. Results of computed tomography performed on 2 cats with well-controlled diabetes and magnetic resonance imaging performed on the remaining 6 cats were considered normal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that cats with insulin resistance suspected to have acromegaly or pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism are likely to have a pituitary mass detectable by means of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216: 1765–1768)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether gonadectomy or age at gonadectomy was associated with the risk that dogs would subsequently become overweight.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—1,930 dogs gonadectomized between 1998 and 2001 at ≤ 6 months of age (n = 782), > 6 months to ≤ 1 year of age (861), or > 1 to ≤ 5 years of age (287) and 1,669 sexually intact dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were followed-up through medical records for ≥ 10 years or until a diagnosis of overweight (defined as overweight, obese, or having a body condition score ≥ 4/5) was recorded. Information extracted included age at study entry, sex, breed, breed-size category, hospital visit frequency, and diagnosis (yes or no) of overweight or diseases that might affect body condition. Relative risk of a diagnosis of overweight was assessed among age groups of gonadectomized dogs and between gonadectomized and sexually intact dogs.

Results—No difference was detected among dogs grouped according to age at gonadectomy with respect to the risk of being overweight. This risk was significantly greater in gonadectomized dogs than in sexually intact dogs, but only during the first 2 years after gonadectomy. Sexually intact male dogs were approximately 40% less likely to have this diagnosis (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.52 to 0.72) than were sexually intact female dogs; no difference in risk between the sexes was evident for gonadectomized dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Gonadectomized dogs had a greater risk of being overweight than did sexually intact dogs, but this risk was not influenced by age at gonadectomy. Opportunities exist for veterinarians to provide counseling during the first years after gonadectomy to help dogs maintain a healthy weight.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association