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  • Author or Editor: Denae C. Wagner x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of estradiol cypionate (ECP) on measures of reproductive efficiency in postparturient dairy cows.

Design—Randomized clinical trial.

Animals—273 cows in a single herd in California.

Procedure—Twenty-four hours after parturition, 122 cows were treated with ECP (4 mg, IM); the remaining 151 cows were untreated controls. Percentages of cattle with abnormal findings during uterine palpation 27 to 40 days after parturition were compared between groups, along with days to first artificial insemination (AI), percentages of cows that were not pregnant after the first AI, and days to pregnancy.

Results—Treatment with ECP did not have a significant effect on whether results of uterine palpation 27 to 40 days after parturition were abnormal, days to first AI, or odds that a cow would be pregnant after the first AI. Treatment with ECP appeared to have a negative effect on days to pregnancy (hazard ratio, 0.72)

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that prophylactic administration of ECP during the early postparturient period in dairy cows did not have measurable beneficial effects on reproductive efficiency. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:220–223)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify associations among change in body weight, behavioral stress score, food intake score, and development of upper respiratory tract infection (URI) among cats admitted to an animal shelter.

Design—Prospective cohort study.

Animals—60 adult cats admitted to an animal shelter.

Procedures—Body weight was measured on days 0 (intake), 7, 14, and 21. Behavioral stress and food intake were scored daily for the first 7 days; cats were monitored daily for URI.

Results—49 of the 60 (82%) cats lost weight during at least 1 week while in the shelter. Fifteen (25%) cats lost ≥ 10% of their body weight while in the shelter. Thirty-five of the 60 (58%) cats developed URI prior to exiting the shelter, and only 4 cats remained at least 21 days without developing URI. Cats with high stress scores during the first week were 5.6 times as likely to develop URI as were cats with low stress scores. Food intake and stress scores were negatively correlated (r = −0.98).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that cats admitted to an animal shelter were likely to lose weight while in the shelter and likely to develop URI, and that cats that had high stress scores were more likely to develop URI.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association