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  • Author or Editor: David T. Matthiesen x
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Summary

During a 5-year period, leiomyosarcoma was diagnosed in 57 dogs. Forty-four dogs were included in the study on the basis of completeness of medical records. All dogs underwent exploratory laparotomy, and dogs were allotted to 4 groups according to primary site of tumor: spleen (16 dogs, median age 10.3 years), stomach/small intestine (13 dogs, median age 10.3 years), cecum (10 dogs, median age 11.8 years), and liver (5 dogs, median age 9 years). All dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the liver had visible metastasis and were euthanatized at surgery. In the other 3 groups, 79% of the dogs had no gross evidence of metastasis at surgery, and 64% survived > 2 weeks. Median survival in these 3 groups was 10 months (range, 1 month to 7 years); 48% died of metastasis, 32% died of unrelated causes, and 16% died of unknown causes. The prognosis in dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the spleen, stomach, small intestine, and especially the cecum is good to excellent if surgery is performed. In dogs with leiomyosarcoma of the liver, the prognosis is poor.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Medical records of 117 dogs with digit masses were reviewed. Of 124 digit masses, 76 (61%) were malignant neoplasms, 25 (20%) were benign neoplasms, and 23 (19%) were pyogranulomatous inflammation. Of 29 digits with radiographic evidence of bone lysis, 24 (83%) were affected by malignant masses, whereas only 5 of 29 (17%) digits with radiographic evidence of bone lysis were affected by benign or pyogranulomatous masses. Only 1 of 19 (5%) dogs with melanoma had radiographic evidence of lysis, but 20 of 25 (80%) dogs with squamous cell carcinoma had radiographic evidence of bone lysis. Thoracic radiographs of 95 dogs were available. Six of 19 (32%) dogs with melanoma had radiographic evidence of pulmonary metastasis at the time of diagnosis, whereas 3 of 24 (13%) dogs with squamous cell carcinoma had radiographic evidence of pulmonary metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Twenty-nine digit neoplasms were squamous cell carcinoma, and 19 of 29 (66%) arose from the subungual epithelium. Of 19 dogs with squamous cell carcinoma originating from the subungual epithelium, 18 (95%) survived for at least 1 year, whereas only 6 of 10 (60%) dogs with squamous cell carcinoma originating in other parts of the digit survived for at least 1 year. Furthermore, of 19 dogs with squamous cell carcinoma originating from the subungual epithelium, 14 (74%) survived at least 2 years, whereas only 4 of 9 (44%) dogs with squamous cell carcinoma originating in other parts of the digit survived for 2 years. Dogs with melanoma of the digits had a median survival time of 12 months, with 10 of 24 (42%) alive at 1 year and 3 of 23 (13%) alive at 2 years. Dogs with mast cell tumor of the digits had a median survival time of 20 months, with 7 of 8 (88%) dogs alive at 1 year and 4 of 8 (50%) alive at 2 years.

Analysis of the results of the study reported here indicated that the prevalence of neoplasms in dogs with digit masses was high. Malignant neoplasms were more prevalent than benign neoplasms, with the most commonly identified types being squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Radiographic evidence of bone lysis was seen in dogs with all types of masses but was more commonly associated with squamous cell carcinoma than with melanoma. Dogs with melanoma of the digit had a higher prevalence of pulmonary metastasis and a poorer prognosis than dogs with squamous cell carcinoma.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Forty-one cases of infiltrative urethral disease in female dogs were reviewed. The cause was epithelial neoplasia in 29 dogs, granulomatous (chronic active) urethritis in 10 dogs, and leiomyoma in 2 dogs. Clinical signs of disease were similar in dogs with neoplastic and inflammatory disease and included strangury (36/41), hematuria (30/41), pollakiuria (20/41), vaginal discharge (16/41), and complete urinary obstruction (7/41). Results of aspiration biopsy of the urethra correlated with those of surgical biopsy in 11 of 15 dogs. In 4 of 15 dogs, results of cytologic and histologic examinations differed. Granulomatous (chronic active) urethritis is an infiltrative urethral disease in female dogs. Clinical findings are similar, but the prognosis is more favorable than that in dogs with urethral epithelial neoplasia.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Partial rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament was diagnosed in 25 dogs. In all dogs, the primary problem at the time of physical examination was hind limb lameness. The mean time from initial onset of lameness to diagnosis at exploratory surgery was 17 weeks. A cranial drawer sign was detected in 13 of the 25 dogs; in 9, the cranial drawer sign was evident only when the stifle was positioned in flexion. Of the 25 dogs, 12 had no detectable cranial drawer sign in response to manipulation of the involved stifle. In all dogs, lateral stifle arthrotomy was performed in routine manner, and the cranial cruciate ligament was found to be incompletely torn. Lesions identified during arthrotomy were rupture of the craniomedial band (n = 20 dogs), interstitial tear (n = 4 dogs), and rupture of the caudolateral band (n = 1 dog).

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association