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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of etodolac administration on results of thyroid function tests and concentrations of plasma proteins in clinically normal dogs.

Animals—19 healthy random-source mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure—Blood samples for measurement of serum thyroxine (T4), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), free T4 (fT4), and endogenous canine thyroid stimulating hormone (cTSH) were measured twice before as well as on days 14 and 28 of etodolac administration (mean dosage, 13.7 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h). Plasma total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations and serum osmolality were measured once before as well as on days 14 and 28 of etodolac administration.

Results—Etodolac administration did not significantly affect serum T4, T3, fT4, or cTSH concentrations or serum osmolality. Significant decreases in plasma total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations were detected on days 14 and 28 of administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of thyroid function tests are not altered when etodolac is administered for up to 4 weeks. Therefore, interpretation of results of these tests should accurately reflect thyroid function during etodolac treatment. Plasma total protein, albumin, or globulin concentrations that are less than the respective reference range in a dog administered etodolac for ≥ 2 weeks may be an effect of treatment rather than an unrelated disease process. A decrease in plasma protein concentrations may reflect subclinical injury of the gastrointestinal tract. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1492–1495)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of endotoxin administration on thyroid function test results and serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) activity in healthy dogs.

Animals—6 healthy adult male dogs.

Procedures—Serum concentrations of thyroxine (T4), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), 3,3'5'-triiodothyronine (rT3), free T4 (fT4), and endogenous canine thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and TNF-α activity were measured before (day–1; baseline), during (days 0 to 3), and after (days 4 to 24) IV administration of endotoxin every 12 hours for 84 hours.

Results—Compared with baseline values, serum T3 concentration decreased significantly, whereas rT3 concentration increased significantly 8 hours after initial endotoxin administration. Serum T4 concentration decreased significantly at 8 and 12 hours after initiating endotoxin administration. Serum T4 concentration returned to reference range limits, then decreased significantly on days 6 to 12 and 16 to 20. Serum fT4 concentration increased significantly at 12, 24, and 48 hours after cessation of endotoxin treatment, compared with baseline values. Serum rT3 concentration returned to reference range, then decreased significantly days 5 and 7 after stopping endotoxin treatment. Serum TNF-α activity was significantly increased only 4 hours after initial endotoxin treatment, compared with baseline activity.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Endotoxin administration modeled alterations in thyroid function test results found in dogs with spontaneous nonthyroidal illness syndrome. A decrease in serum T4 and T3 concentrations and increase in serum rT3 concentration indicate impaired secretion and metabolism of thyroid hormones. The persistent decrease in serum T4 concentration indicates that caution should be used in interpreting serum T4 concentrations after resolution of an illness in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:229–234)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine prevalence of retinal hemorrhages and microaneurysms in dogs with diabetes mellitus following cataract extraction by means of phacoemulsification and identify potential risk factors.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—52 dogs with diabetes mellitus and 174 dogs without.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs undergoing phacoemulsification between 1993 and 2003 were reviewed, and information was recorded on signalment, history, physical examination findings, ophthalmic examination findings, results of laboratory testing, electroretinographic findings, and surgical findings. Glycemic control was classified as poor, intermediate, or good on the basis of baseline blood glucose concentration, perioperative body weight loss, daily insulin dosage, and presence of glucosuria and ketonuria. Data from diabetic and nondiabetic dogs were analyzed to determine prevalence and risk factors for development of retinal hemorrhages or microaneurysms following phacoemulsification.

Results—11 of the 52 (21%) dogs with diabetes mellitus developed ophthalmoscopic signs of retinal hemorrhages or microaneurysms, compared with 1 of the 174 (0.6%) nondiabetic dogs. Median time from onset of diabetes mellitus to diagnosis of retinopathy was 1.4 years (range, 0.5 to 3.2 years). No risk factors for development of retinopathy were identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that retinal hemorrhages and microaneurysms may be more common and develop earlier in diabetic dogs than previously reported. This may affect treatment, as diabetic dogs survive longer with improved glycemic control. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225: 709–716)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objectives—To measure urine concentrations of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), determine optimal storage conditions for urine samples, establish a reference range, and determine whether there is correlation between 24-hour total urine GAG excretion and the GAG-to-creatinine ratio (GCR).

Animals—14 healthy adult dogs.

Procedure—Single urine sample GAG concentrations and GCRs were measured in samples collected from 14 healthy dogs at the start of the 24-hour collection period. Twenty-four–hour total urine GAG excretions were determined from urine collected during a 24-hour period in the same 14 dogs. Total sulfated GAG concentrations were also measured in urine from these dogs after the urine had been stored at 4°C and -20°C for 1, 7, and 30 days.

Results—Urine GAG concentrations were not significantly different from baseline values after urine was stored at 4°C for up to 1 day and -20°C for up to 30 days. Neither single urine sample GAG concentration (R , 0.422) nor GCR (R , 0.084) was an adequate predictor of 24-hour total urine GAG excretion.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study provide data that can be used to establish a reference range for 24-hour total urine GAG excretion in dogs and adequate conditions for sample storage. Contrary to findings in humans, there was no significant linear correlation between 24-hour total urine GAG excretion and single urine sample GCR in dogs, limiting clinical use of the single urine sample test.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of deracoxib and aspirin on serum concentrations of thyroxine (T4), 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3), free thyroxine (fT4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in healthy dogs.

Animals—24 dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were allocated to 1 of 3 groups of 8 dogs each. Dogs received the vehicle used for deracoxib tablets (PO, q 8 h; placebo), aspirin (23 to 25 mg/kg, PO, q 8 h), or deracoxib (1.25 to 1.8 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) and placebo (PO, q 8 h) for 28 days. Measurement of serum concentrations of T4, T3, fT4, and TSH were performed 7 days before treatment (day −7), on days 14 and 28 of treatment, and 14 days after treatment was discontinued. Plasma total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations were measured on days −7 and 28.

Results—Mean serum T4, fT4, and T3 concentrations decreased significantly from baseline on days 14 and 28 of treatment in dogs receiving aspirin, compared with those receiving placebo. Mean plasma total protein, albumin, and globulin concentrations on day 28 decreased significantly in dogs receiving aspirin, compared with those receiving placebo. Fourteen days after administration of aspirin was stopped, differences in hormone concentrations were no longer significant. Differences in serum TSH or the free fraction of T4 were not detected at any time. No significant difference in any of the analytes was detected at any time in dogs treated with deracoxib.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Aspirin had substantial suppressive effects on thyroid hormone concentrations in dogs. Treatment with high dosages of aspirin, but not deracoxib, should be discontinued prior to evaluation of thyroid function.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of oral prednisone administration with or without ultralow-dose acetylsalicylic acid on coagulation parameters in healthy dogs and to assess intraindividual variation in thromboelastography results.

Animals—14 healthy research dogs and 10 healthy client-owned dogs.

Procedures—In a randomized controlled trial, research dogs underwent thromboelastography twice (3 days apart), and intraindividual variation in test results was calculated. Dogs were given prednisone (2 mg/kg/d, PO) plus acetylsalicylic acid (0.5 mg/kg/d, PO) or prednisone (2 mg/kg/d, PO) plus a placebo for 14 days, after which thromboelastography and other tests were repeated. Differences from preadministration (baseline) test results between and within groups were compared. In a separate trial, client-owned dogs also underwent thromboelastography twice 2 days apart to assess intraindividual variation in untreated dogs.

Results—Intraindividual variation in thromboelastography results for research dogs was ≤ 10% for maximum amplitude (MA) and α angle. In the research dogs, MA and fibrinogen values significantly increased from baseline, whereas percentage lysis 30 minutes after attainment of the MA as well as antithrombin activity significantly decreased within each group. In the dogs that received prednisone plus a placebo, percentage lysis 60 minutes after attainment of the MA was significantly lower than at baseline. For all parameters for research dogs, there was no difference between groups for change from baseline. Intraindividual variation in findings for client-owned dogs was similar to the variation for research dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Prednisone administration resulted in hypercoagulability in healthy dogs as indicated by an increase in MA and plasma fibrinogen concentration and a decrease in antithrombin activity. Concurrent ultralow-dose acetylsalicylic acid use had no effect on measured thromboelastography values. The high intraindividual variation in some thromboelastography parameters may preclude routine use of this technique in clinical practice.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the accuracy of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the liver and cytologic findings in dogs and cats.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—56 dogs and 41 cats.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs and cats evaluated from 1990 to 2000 by use of cytologic and histopathologic examination of the liver were reviewed. Histologic and cytologic diagnoses were categorized as vacuolar hepatopathy, inflammation, neoplasia, cirrhosis, primary cholestasis, shunt, normal, and other.

Results—Overall agreement between the histopathologic diagnosis and cytologic diagnosis was found in 17 of the 56 (30.3%) canine cases and 21 of the 41 (51.2%) feline cases. Vacuolar hepatopathy was the category with the highest percentage of agreement. Vacuolar hepatopathy was identified via cytologic examination in 7 of 11 and 15 of 18 dogs and cats, respectively, in which histopathologic examination revealed that it was the predominant disease process. However, it was also the category that was most commonly misdiagnosed via cytologic examination. Inflammatory disease was accurately identified cytologically in 5 of 20 and 3 of 11 dogs and cats, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Acknowledging the limitations of cytology and the extent of discrepancies between cytologic and histopathologic findings in dogs and cats will help clinicians make better decisions in diagnosing liver disease. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004; 224:75–78)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To study the effects of experimentally induced hypothyroidism on skeletal muscle and characterize any observed myopathic abnormalities in dogs.

Animals—9 female, adult mixed-breed dogs; 6 with hypothyroidism induced with irradiation with 131 iodine and 3 untreated control dogs.

Procedures—Clinical examinations were performed monthly. Electromyographic examinations; measurement of plasma creatine kinase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate, and lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme activities; and skeletal muscle morphologic-morphometric examinations were performed prior to and every 6 months for 18 months after induction of hypothyroidism. Baseline, 6-month, and 18-month assessments of plasma, urine, and skeletal muscle carnitine concentrations were also performed.

Results—Hypothyroid dogs developed electromyographic and morphologic evidence of myopathy by 6 months after treatment, which persisted throughout the study, although these changes were subclinical at all times. Hypothyroid myopathy was associated with significant increases in plasma creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase 5 isoenzyme activities and was characterized by nemaline rod inclusions, substantial and progressive predominance of type I myofibers, decrease in mean type II fiber area, subsarcolemmal accumulations of abnormal mitochondria, and myofiber degeneration. Chronic hypothyroidism was associated with substantial depletion in skeletal muscle free carnitine.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Chronic, experimentally induced hypothyroidism resulted in substantial but subclinical phenotypic myopathic changes indicative of altered muscle energy metabolism and depletion of skeletal muscle carnitine. These abnormalities may contribute to nonspecific clinical signs, such as lethargy and exercise intolerance, often reported in hypothyroid dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 7-year-old castrated male Havanese was evaluated at a veterinary teaching hospital because of a 12-week history of hyperactivity, aggression, and progressive weight loss despite a healthy appetite.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Tachycardia was the only remarkable finding during physical examination. Serum 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) and free T3 concentrations were markedly increased, and thyroxine (T4), free T4, and thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations were at or decreased from the respective reference ranges. Thyroid scintigraphy revealed suppressed uptake of sodium pertechnetate Tc 99m by the thyroid gland but no ectopic thyroid tissue, which was indicative of thyrotoxicosis induced by an exogenous source of T3.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME The dog was hospitalized for 24 hours, and its diet was changed, after which the clinical signs rapidly resolved and serum T3 and free T3 concentrations returned to within the respective reference ranges. This raised suspicion of an exogenous source of T3 in the dog's home environment. Analysis of the commercial beef-based canned food the dog was being fed revealed a high concentration of T3 (1.39 μg/g) and an iodine (82.44 μg/g) concentration that exceeded industry recommendations. No other source of T3 was identified in the dog's environment.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE To our knowledge, this is the first report of clinical thyrotoxicosis in a dog induced by exogenous T3, although the source of exogenous T3 was not identified. This case highlights the importance of measuring serum T3 and thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations in addition to T4 and free T4 concentrations when there is incongruity between clinical findings and thyroid function test results.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association