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  • Author or Editor: David L. Morris x
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Abstract

Objective—To measure trends in animal shelter intake and outcome data for dogs and cats in Colorado on a statewide, urban, and rural basis from 2000 through 2007.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Sample Population—A group of 104 animal shelters and rescue organizations from Colorado representing 92% and 94% of statewide dog and cat intake, respectively, in 2007.

Procedures—Annual animal shelter data were analyzed for trends by use of linear regression analysis. Trends in urban and rural subgroups of shelters were compared by use of Student t tests.

Results—Statewide, the number of intakes/1,000 residents decreased by 10.8% for dogs during the 8-year study period, but increased by 19.9% for cats. There was no change in the dog euthanasia rate at 3.7/1,000 residents/y, but the rate for cats increased by 35.7% to 3.9/1,000 residents/y. There was no change in the statewide live release rate for dogs or cats, but there was a decrease of 12.6% for cats in the urban subgroup.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The trends suggested that the number of unwanted dogs in Colorado decreased during the study period, whereas the number of unwanted cats in animal shelters increased. There were clear differences in the trends in the urban and rural data, suggesting different needs in each type of community. At the current level of resource allocation, the shelter dynamics for dogs appeared to have reached equilibrium with respect to euthanasia. Transfers were increasingly being used within all regions of the state to optimize the chances of adoption.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize the radiosensitivity and capacity for sublethal damage repair (SLDR) of radiation-induced injury in 4 canine osteosarcoma cell lines.

Sample Population—4 canine osteosarcoma cell lines (HMPOS, POS, COS 31, and D17).

Procedures—A clonogenic colony-forming assay was used to evaluate the cell lines' intrinsic radiosensitivities and SLDR capacities. Dose-response curves for the cell lines were generated by fitting the surviving fractions after radiation doses of 0 (control cells), 1, 2, 3, 6, and 9 Gy to a linear quadratic model. To evaluate SLDR, cell lines were exposed to 2 doses of 3 Gy (split-dose experiments) at an interval of 0 (single 6-Gy dose), 2, 4, 6, or 24 hours, after which the surviving fractions were assessed.

Results—Mean surviving fraction did not differ significantly among the 4 cell lines at the radiation doses tested. Mean surviving fraction at 2 Gy was high (0.62), and the α/β ratios (predictor of tissue sensitivity to radiation therapy) for the cell lines were low (mean ratio, 3.47). The split-dose experiments revealed a 2.8- to 3.9-fold increase in cell survival when the radiation doses were applied at an interval of 24 hours, compared with cell survival after radiation doses were applied consecutively (0-hour interval).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that these canine osteosarcoma cell lines are fairly radioresistant; α/β ratios were similar to those of nonneoplastic, lateresponding tissues. Future clinical investigations should involve increasing the fraction size in a manner that maximizes tumor killing without adverse effects on the nonneoplastic surrounding tissues.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research