Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 25 items for

  • Author or Editor: David J. Schaeffer x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To test the hypothesis that strangulation of the small intestine by a lipoma or in the epiploic foramen is more common in older horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—46 horses.

Procedure—Ages of horses with strangulation of the small intestine by a lipoma (n = 29) or in the epiploic foramen (17) were compared with ages of 79 horses with miscellaneous small intestinal lesions. Effects of increasing age on risk of the diseases of interest were examined by use of logistic regression and a 1-sided trend test for binomial proportions.

Results—Mean age of the horses with strangulation in the epiploic foramen (9.6 years) was the same as that for the horses with miscellaneous small intestinal lesions (7.7), but mean age of the horses with strangulation by a lipoma (19.2) was significantly greater than that for the other groups. The proportion of horses with lipoma increased significantly with increasing age, but the proportion with strangulation in the epiploic foramen did not.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results refute the current suggestion that increasing age predisposes horses for strangulation of the small intestine in the epiploic foramen but support the suggestion that the risk of strangulation of the small intestine by a lipoma increases with age. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:87–89)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate survival rate and complications after jejunocecostomy in horses with colic and to compare outcomes after hand-sewn versus stapled side-to-side jejunocecostomy.

Design—Retrospective cohort study. Animals—32 horses.

Procedures—Information was retrieved from medical records and through telephone calls on horses that had a hand-sewn or stapled side-to-side jejunocecostomy for treatment of colic, which was performed by or under the supervision of the same surgeon. KaplanMeier life table analysis was used to compare survival times and rates between horses that underwent a hand-sewn or stapled side-to-side anastomosis.

Results—32 horses met inclusion criteria; 22 underwent a hand-sewn anastomosis, and 10 underwent a stapled anastomosis. Horses in the stapled group had a significantly greater prevalence of postoperative colic and combined postoperative colic and reflux than horses in the hand-sewn group. In the hand-sewn group, repeated celiotomy was performed within the same hospitalization period for 3 of 22 horses; in the stapled group, 4 of 10 horses had repeated celiotomies. Hospital discharge rates (ie, short-term survival rates) were similar between horses in the hand-sewn group (20/22 horses) and those in the stapled group (9/10 horses). Long-term survival rates were similar for both groups, ranging from 5 to 126 months. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Short- and long-term results justify use of jejunocecostomy in horses. Despite similar survival rates between groups, horses that underwent a stapled anastomosis had significantly greater prevalences of postoperative complications than horses that underwent a hand-sewn anastomosis, suggesting that horses were sensitive to minor differences in anastomosis techniques.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare results of hematologic testing in nondiabetic and diabetic cats to identify possible indicators of alterations in long-term glucose control.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—117 client-owned cats (76 nondiabetic cats [25 with normal body condition, 27 overweight, and 24 obese] and 41 naïve [n = 21] and treated [20] diabetic cats).

Procedures—Signalment and medical history, including data on feeding practices, were collected. A body condition score was assigned, and feline body mass index was calculated. Complete blood counts and serum biochemical analyses, including determination of fructosamine, thyroxine, insulin, and proinsulin concentrations, were performed. Urine samples were obtained and analyzed.

Results—Glucose and fructosamine concentrations were significantly higher in the naïve and treated diabetic cats than in the nondiabetic cats. Insulin and proinsulin concentrations were highest in the obese cats but had great individual variation. Few other variables were significantly different among cat groups. Most cats, even when obese or diabetic, had unlimited access to food.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that cats at risk of developing diabetes (ie, overweight and obese cats) could not be distinguished from cats with a normal body condition on the basis of results of isolated hematologic testing. A longitudinal study is indicated to follow nondiabetic cats over a period of several years to identify those that eventually develop diabetes. Findings also suggested that dietary education of cat owners might be inadequate.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine and compare the effect of hoof boots (HBs) and shoes with a toe extension on stance duration, ground reaction force, and sole length in contact with the ground in nonlame horses during walking.

ANIMALS 6 nonlame Standardbreds.

PROCEDURES Force plate gait analyses of the forelimbs were performed while the horses were walking barefoot before manipulation of feet (baseline), while the horses were walking fitted with HBs, while the horses were walking shod with toe-extension shoes, and while the horses were walking barefoot after shoe removal. Horses underwent radiography of both forelimb feet to determine the sole length in contact with the ground when barefoot, wearing HBs, and shod with toe-extension shoes. Stance duration, ground reaction force, and sole length were compared among the various walking sessions.

RESULTS Compared with baseline findings, stance duration increased significantly when horses were fitted with HBs (7%) or toe-extension shoes (5%). Peak forelimb ground reaction force was similar among walking sessions; however, time of braking force peak was significantly greater during the stance phase only when horses wore HBs. Also, the sole length in contact with the ground was significantly longer in horses fitted with HBs (14.3 cm) or shod with the toe-extension shoes (17.6 cm), compared with that for one of the barefoot hooves (12.7 cm).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In nonlame horses, use of HBs prolonged the stance time and time of braking force peak, which is indicative of a slower deceleration phase during limb impact with the ground. Also, the use of HBs prolonged the deceleration phase of the stride and increased the sole length in contact with the ground.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To characterize spatial release of platinum from carboplatin-impregnated calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CI-CSH) beads by use of an agarose tissue phantom.

SAMPLE 3-mm-diameter beads (n = 60) containing 4.6 mg of carboplatin (2.4 mg of platinum)/bead.

PROCEDURES 18 L of 1% agarose was prepared and poured into 36 containers (10 × 10 × 10 cm), each of which was filled half full (0.5 L/container). After the agarose solidified, 1, 3, 6, or 10 CI-CSH beads were placed on the agar in defined patterns. An additional 36 blocks of agar (0.5 L/block) were placed atop the beads, positioning the beads in the center of 1 L of agar. The experiment was replicated 3 times for each bead pattern for 24, 48, and 72 hours. At these times, representative agarose blocks were sectioned in the x-, y-, and z-planes and labeled in accordance with their positions in shells radiating 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 cm from the center of the blocks. Agarose from each shell was homogenized, and a sample was submitted for platinum analysis by use of inductively coupled plasma–mass spectroscopy.

RESULTS Platinum diffused from CI-CSH beads at predicted anticancer cytotoxic concentrations for 2 to 5 cm.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results provided information regarding the spatial distribution of platinum expected to occur in vivo. Agarose may be used as a diffusion model, mimicking the characteristics of subcutaneous tissues. Measured platinum concentrations might be used to guide patterns for implantation of CI-CSH beads in animals with susceptible neoplasms.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the rate of development of septic arthritis after elective arthroscopy and evaluate associations between various factors and development of this complication in horses.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—682 horses that underwent arthroscopic procedures at the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital from 1994 to 2003.

Procedures—Information pertaining to signalment, joints treated, whether antimicrobials were administered, and development of postoperative septic arthritis was collected from medical records. Horses with a primary problem of septic arthritis or wounds involving joints were excluded. The following factors were evaluated to determine their roles in joint sepsis: breed, sex, joint, and preoperative and intra-articular administration of antimicrobials. Telephone interviews with clients were used to determine whether unreported septic arthritis had developed.

Results—8 of 932 (0.9%) joints in 7 of 682 (1.0%) horses that underwent arthroscopy developed postoperative septic arthritis. Follow-up information after discharge from the hospital was available for 461 of the 682 horses, and of those, 8 of 627 (1.3%) joints in 7 of 461 (1.5%) horses developed septic arthritis. Breed and joint treated were significant risk factors for development of postoperative septic arthritis, with draft breeds and tibiotarsal joints more likely than others to be affected. Sex, preoperatively administered antimicrobials, and intra-articularly administered antimicrobials were not associated with development of postoperative septic arthritis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results can be used for comparison with data from other institutions and surgical facilities. Additional precautions should be undertaken when arthroscopic surgery involves draft breeds and tibiotarsal joints.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare pathologic changes of the horizontal ear canal associated with chronic severe otitis externa between Cocker Spaniels and dogs of other breeds.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—80 dogs with severe otitis externa that required total ear canal ablation with lateral bulla osteotomy.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed for breed, sex, and age at time of surgery. Histologic specimens from the horizontal ear canal were evaluated by a single examiner for overall tissue response pattern and scored for sebaceous gland hyperplasia, ceruminous gland hyperplasia, ceruminous gland ectasia, fibrosis, pigment-laden macrophages, and osseous metaplasia.

Results—48 of 80 (60%) dogs were Cocker Spaniels. Thirty-five of 48 (72.9%) Cocker Spaniels had a predominately ceruminous tissue response pattern; only 9 of 32 (28.1%) dogs of other breeds had the same pattern. Other breeds most commonly had a pattern dominated by fibrosis (n = 13 [40.6%]); fibrosis was the predominant pattern in only 4 of 48 (8.3%) Cocker Spaniels. Discriminant analysis and K-means clustering of 4 histopathologic criteria correctly classified 75% of the dogs as Cocker Spaniels or all other breeds.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cocker Spaniels are at increased risk for chronic severe otitis externa requiring total ear canal ablation with lateral bulla osteotomy, indicating that earlier and more aggressive management of the primary otitis externa and secondary inflammation is warranted in this breed. Cocker Spaniels with chronic severe otitis externa have distinct differences in pathologic characteristics of the horizontal ear canal, compared with other breeds. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;221: 1000–1006)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare surgical site infection and inflammation rates between the use of nonimpregnated (polydioxanone and poliglecaprone 25) versus triclosan-impregnated (polydioxanone and poliglecaprone 25) suture for incisional closure in dogs undergoing a standardized orthopedic procedure (tibial plateau leveling osteotomy [TPLO]).

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—283 dogs that underwent TPLO between November 2005 and December 2009.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for age; body weight; body condition score; use of propofol; perioperative and postoperative administration of antimicrobials; presence of a preoperative infection; use of a jig; technique of joint exploration; type of suture material (triclosan impregnated vs nonimpregnated) used to close the pes anserinus, subcutaneous layer, and subcuticular layer; use of staples or suture to close the skin; and surgery and anesthesia durations. The outcome variables were surgical site inflammation and infection.

Results—Rates of infection and inflammation did not differ between surgeries for which triclosan-impregnated suture was used (n = 159 [8.8%, and 18.8%, respectively]) and those for which nonimpregnated suture was used (112 [10.7% and 15.2%, respectively]). The use of staples, compared with suture, to close the skin significantly decreased the inflammation rate.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Compared with in vitro conditions, in vivo conditions (where the environment is not controlled and triclosan may elute more quickly from the suture) may decrease the antibacterial effectiveness of triclosan-impregnated suture. On the basis of our findings, triclosan-impregnated sutures did not seem to provide an additional benefit for clinical use and cannot be strongly recommended for elective orthopedic procedures in veterinary medicine.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association