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Abstract

Objective—To determine frequency with which Staphylococcus schleiferi could be isolated from dogs with pyoderma and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of isolates that were obtained.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—54 dogs with a first (n = 14) or recurrent (40) episode of pyoderma.

Procedure—Specimens were obtained and submitted for bacterial culture. Isolates were identified as S schleiferi on the basis of growth and biochemical characteristics. Two isolates were submitted for DNA sequencing to confirm identification. Methicillin susceptibility was determined by means of disk diffusion with oxacillin-impregnated disks.

Results—3 of 14 dogs examined because of a first episode of pyoderma and 12 of 40 dogs examined because of a recurrent episode of pyoderma were receiving antimicrobials at the time of specimen collection. Staphylococcus schleiferi was not isolated from any dog with first-time pyoderma but was isolated from 5 dogs with recurrent pyoderma that were not receiving antimicrobials at the time of specimen collection and 10 dogs with recurrent pyoderma that were receiving antimicrobials. Nine isolates were identified as S schleiferi subsp schleiferi, and 6 were identified as S schleiferi subsp coagulans. All S schleiferi subsp schleiferi isolates were resistant to methicillin, but only 2 S schleiferi subsp coagulans isolates were. Two methicillin-resistant isolates were also resistant to fluoroquinolones, and 1 isolate had intermediate susceptibility to fluoroquinolones.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that S schleiferi subsp schleiferi and S schleiferi subsp coagulans may be isolated from dogs with recurrent pyoderma. Although isolates from dogs with pyoderma were frequently resistant to methicillin, multiple drug resistance was uncommon. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:451–454)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To determine effects of protein intake on blood variables, plasma volume, and maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max) in sled dogs undergoing rigorous training.

Animals

32 Alaskan sled dogs, between 2 and 6 years old.

Procedure

Dogs were assigned to 1 of 4 groups on the basis of age, sex, and ability. Isocaloric diets containing 18% (diet A), 23% (diet B), 29% (diet C), or 35% (diet D) of energy as protein were assigned randomly to each group and fed 1 month before and during a 12-week training period. Maximal oxygen uptake was measured at 0 (before training) and 12 weeks. Body weight, protein and energy intake, plasma volume, PCV, hemoglobin concentration, and serum biochemical variables were measured at 0, 8, and 12 weeks.

Results

Serum biochemical variables, PCV, and hemoglobin concentration remained within reference ranges for all dogs. Dogs fed diet A had a decrease in Vo2max and a greater rate of soft tissue injury throughout training, compared with dogs fed the other diets. At 12 weeks, dogs fed diets C and D had greater serum sodium concentration and hemoglobin concentration than did dogs fed diet A. Dogs fed diet D also had more plasma volume at 12 weeks than did dogs of any other group.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Consumption of a diet with 18% dietary protein on an energy basis (3.0 g of protein/kg of body weight) is insufficient to meet the metabolic requirements of sled dogs in training. For intense interval work, a diet with 35% dietary protein as energy (6.0 g of protein/kg) may provide a performance advantage by promoting an increase in plasma volume. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60: 789–795)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) concentrations and degree of oxidation of ascorbic acid in horses affected by recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) in the presence and absence of neutrophilic airway inflammation.

Animals—6 RAO-affected horses and 8 healthy control horses.

Procedure—Nonenzymatic antioxidant concentrations were determined in RBC, plasma, and ELF samples of control horses and RAO-affected horses in the presence and absence of airway inflammation.

Results—ELF ascorbic acid concentration was decreased in RAO-affected horses with airway inflammation (median, 0.06 mmol/L; 25th and 75th percentiles, 0.0 and 0.4 mmol/L), compared with RAOaffected horses without airway inflammation (1.0 mmol/L; 0.7 and 1.5 mmol/L) and control horses (2.2 mmol/L; 1.4 and 2.2 mmol/L). Epithelial lining fluid ascorbic acid remained significantly lower in RAOaffected horses without airway inflammation than in control horses. Moreover, the ELF ascorbic acid redox ratio (ie, ratio of the concentrations of dehydroascorbate to total ascorbic acid) was higher in RAO-affected horses with airway inflammation (median, 0.85; 25th and 75th percentiles, 0.25 and 1.00), compared with RAOaffected horses without airway inflammation (0.04; 0.02 and 0.22). The number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was inversely related to the ELF ascorbic acid concentration ( r = –0.81) and positively correlated with the ascorbic acid redox ratio ( r= 0.65).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Neutrophilic inflammation in horses affected by RAO is associated with a reduction in the ELF ascorbic acid pool. Nutritional supplementation with ascorbic acid derivatives in horses affected by RAO is an area for further investigation. ( Am J Vet Res2004;65:80–87)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess the analytic sensitivity of an inertial sensor system for detection of the more severely affected forelimb in horses with bilateral lameness.

Animals—18 adult horses with forelimb lameness.

Procedures—Horses were fitted with inertial sensors and evaluated for lameness with a stationary force plate as they were trotted in a straight line. Inertial sensor-derived measurements for vertical head movement asymmetry (HMA) and vector sum (VS) of maximum and minimum head height differences between right and left halves of the stride were used to predict differences in mean peak vertical force (PVF) as a percentage of body weight between the right and left forelimbs. Repeatability was compared by calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for each variable. Correct classification percentages for the lamer forelimb were determined by use of a stationary force plate as the standard.

Results—SEs of the prediction of difference in PVF between the right and left forelimbs from HMA and VS were 6.1% and 5.2%, respectively. Head movement asymmetry (ICC, 0.72) was less repeatable than PVF (ICC, 0.86) and VS (ICC, 0.84). Associations were positive and significant between HMA (R 2 = 0.73) and VS (R 2 = 0.81) and the difference in PVF between the right and left forelimbs. Correct classification percentages for HMA and VS for detecting the lamer forelimb were 83.3% and 77.8%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that an inertial sensor system to measure vertical asymmetry (HMA and VS) due to forelimb lameness in horses trotting in a straight line has adequate analytic sensitivity for clinical use. Additional studies are required to assess specificity of the system.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the methicillin-resistant profile of staphylococcal isolates from the skin of dogs with pyoderma.

Animals—90 dogs with pyoderma.

Procedure—Staphylococci isolated from dogs with pyoderma were tested for susceptibility to methicillin by use of a standard disk diffusion test with oxacillin disks. The DNA extracted from the isolates was tested for the mecA gene that encodes the penicillinbinding protein 2a (PBP2a) by use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The expression of PBP2a was determined with a commercial latex agglutination assay. Species of staphylococcal isolates were identified by use of morphologic, biochemical, and enzymatic tests.

Results—Most of the isolated staphylococci were methicillin-susceptible, coagulase-positive Staphylococcus intermedius isolates. Whereas only 2 of 57 S intermedius isolates were resistant to methicillin, approximately half of the isolates had the mecA gene and produced PBP2a. Staphylococcus schleiferi was the second most common isolate. Widespread resistance to methicillin was found among S schleiferi isolates. More coagulase-negative S schleiferi isolates were identified with mecA gene-mediated resistance to methicillin, compared with coagulase-positive S schleiferi isolates.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The latex agglutination assay for the detection of PBP2a expression coupled with the PCR assay for the mecA gene may provide new information about emerging antimicrobial resistance among staphylococcal isolates. (Am J Vet Res2004;65:1265–1268)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the frequency of isolation and susceptibility patterns of Staphylococcus schleiferi from healthy dogs and dogs with otitis, pyoderma, or both that had or had not received antimicrobial treatment.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—50 dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were allocated to 1 of 4 groups: healthy dogs (n = 13), dogs without otitis but with pyoderma (10), dogs with otitis but without pyoderma (11), and dogs with otitis and pyoderma (16). Bacteriologic culture of ear swab specimens was performed in all dogs. Bacteriologic culture of skin swab specimens was also performed in dogs with concurrent pyoderma. Isolates were identified as S schleiferi subsp schleiferi or S schleiferi subsp coagulanson the basis of growth and biochemical characteristics.

ResultsS schleiferi was not isolated from any dogs with pyoderma only. Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp schleiferi was isolated from the ears of 2 healthy dogs, and the skin and ears of 2 dogs and the skin of 1 dog with otitis and pyoderma. Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp coagulans was isolated from the ears of 3 dogs with otitis only, and the ears of 6 dogs and the skin of 2 dogs with otitis and pyoderma. One of the S schleiferi subsp schleiferi isolates from ears, 2 of the S schleiferi subsp coagulansisolates from ears, and 1 of the S schleiferi subsp coagulansisolates from the skin were resistant to methicillin. One methicillin-resistant isolate from the ears and 1 from the skin were also resistant to fluoroquinolones.

Conclusions and Clinical RelevanceS schleiferi subsp schleiferiwas detected in healthy dogs and dogs with otitis and pyoderma. Methicillin-resistant and -susceptible S schleiferi subsp schleiferi and S schleiferi subsp coagulans were detected as the predominant organisms in dogs with otitis. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:928–931)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether resistance to oxacillin and other antimicrobials in 3 Staphylococcus spp commonly isolated from dogs increased from 2001 to 2005.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Sample Population—1,772 clinical samples of various types obtained from dogs examined at the University of Tennessee Veterinary Teaching Hospital or at regional veterinary hospitals and submitted to the bacteriology and mycology laboratories associated with the teaching hospital.

Procedures—Samples were submitted by attending veterinarians to the bacteriology and mycology laboratories for routine aerobic microbial culture. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility procedures were performed on all isolates. Susceptibility reports for each antimicrobial and Staphylococcus spp were determined from aggregate electronically archived test results. Oxacillin and multidrug resistance for Staphylococcus intermedius was analyzed by reviewing disk diffusion zone measurements.

Results—Oxacillin resistance increased among S intermedius isolates during the past 5 years, and the increase was associated with multidrug resistance. In 2005, 1 in 5 Staphylococcus spp isolates from canine clinical samples was resistant to oxacillin. The most common staphylococcal species isolated were S intermedius (n = 37), Staphylococcus schleiferi (21), and Staphylococcus aureus (4), and frequencies of oxacillin resistance in isolates of these species were 15.6%, 46.6%, and 23.5%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Veterinarians should be aware of the potential for empiric drug treatment failures in instances where Staphylococcus spp infections are common (eg, pyoderma). Judicious use of bacterial culture and susceptibility testing is recommended.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize compensatory movements of the head and pelvis that resemble lameness in horses.

Animals—17 adult horses.

Procedure—Kinematic evaluations were performed while horses trotted on a treadmill before and after shoe-induced lameness. Lameness was quantified and the affected limb determined by algorithms that measured asymmetry in vertical movement of the head and pelvis. Induced primary lameness and compensatory movements resembling lameness were assessed by the Friedman test. Association between induced lameness and compensatory movements was examined by regression analysis.

Results—Compensatory movements resembling lameness in the ipsilateral forelimb were seen with induced lameness of a hind limb. There was less downward and less upward head movement during and after the stance phase of the ipsilateral forelimb. Doubling the severity of lameness in the hind limb increased severity of the compensatory movements in the ipsilateral forelimb by 50%. Compensatory movements resembling lameness of the hind limb were seen after induced lameness in a forelimb. There was less upward movement of the pelvis after the stance phase of the contralateral hind limb and, to a lesser extent, less downward movement of the pelvis during the stance phase of the ipsilateral hind limb. Doubling the severity of lameness in the forelimb increased compensatory movements of the contralateral hind limb by 5%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Induced lameness in a hind limb causes prominent compensatory movements resembling lameness in the ipsilateral forelimb. Induced lameness in a forelimb causes slight compensatory movements resembling lameness in the ipsilateral and contralateral hind limbs. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:646–655)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare a sensor-based accelerometer-gyroscopic (A-G) system with a video-based motion analysis system (VMAS) technique for detection and quantification of lameness in horses.

Animals—8 adult horses.

Procedure—2 horses were evaluated once, 2 had navicular disease and were evaluated before and after nerve blocks, and 4 had 2 levels of shoe-induced lameness, alternatively, in each of 4 limbs. Horses were instrumented with an accelerometer transducer on the head and pelvis, a gyroscopic transducer on the right forelimb and hind feet, and a receiver-transmitter. Signals from the A-G system were collected simultaneously with those from the VMAS for collection of head, pelvis, and right feet positions with horses trotting on a treadmill. Lameness was detected with an algorithm that quantified lameness as asymmetry of head and pelvic movements. Comparisons between the A-G and VMAS systems were made by use of correlation and agreement (κ value) analyses.

Results—Correlation between the A-G and VMAS systems for quantification of lameness was linear and high ( r 2 = 0.9544 and 0.8235 for forelimb and hind limb, respectively). Quantification of hind limb lameness with the A-G system was higher than measured via VMAS. Agreement between the 2 methods for detection of lameness was excellent (κ = 0.76) for the forelimb and good (κ = 0.56) for the hind limb.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The A-G system detected and quantified forelimb and hind limb lameness in horses trotting on the treadmill. Because the data are collected wirelessly, this system might be used to objectively evaluate lameness in the field. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:665–670)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare data obtained with an inertial sensor system with results of subjective lameness examinations performed by 3 experienced equine veterinarians for evaluation of lameness in horses.

Animals—106 horses.

Procedures—Horses were evaluated for lameness with a body-mounted inertial sensor system during trotting in a straight line and via subjective evaluation by 3 experienced equine practitioners who performed complete lameness examinations including lunging in a circle and limb flexion tests. Agreement among evaluators regarding results of subjective evaluations and correlations and agreements between various inertial sensor measures and results of subjective lameness evaluations were determined via calculation of Fleiss’ κ statistic, regression analysis, and calculation of 95% prediction intervals.

Results—Evaluators agreed on classification of horses into 3 mutually exclusive lameness categories (right limb lameness severity greater than left limb lameness severity, left limb lameness severity greater than right limb lameness severity, or equal right and left limb lameness severity) for 58.8% (κ = 0.37) and 54.7% (κ = 0.31) of horses for forelimb and hind limb lameness, respectively. All inertial sensor measures for forelimb and hind limb lameness were positively and significantly correlated with results of subjective evaluations. Agreement between inertial sensors measures and results of subjective evaluations was fair to moderate for forelimb lameness and slight to fair for hind limb lameness.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of lameness evaluation of horses with an inertial sensor system and via subjective lameness examinations were significantly correlated but did not have strong agreement. Inertial sensor-based evaluation may augment but not replace subjective lameness examination of horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research