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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of 6% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 670/0.75 and 6% HES 130/0.4 dilution of canine whole blood on coagulation using dynamic viscoelastic coagulometry (DVC).

ANIMALS

56 healthy adult dogs.

PROCEDURES

2 blood samples were obtained from each dog and randomized to 1 of 7 groups—undiluted or 2 dilutions (1:3 or 1:10) of 3 different fluids: saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, 6% HES 670/0.75, or 6% HES 130/0.4. Dilutions were calculated to simulate approximately a 10- or 30-mL/kg body weight IV bolus of each fluid. DVC was performed on each sample. Coagulation parameters compared between groups included clot rate (CR), platelet function (PF), and activated clotting time.

RESULTS

Dilution with saline solution did not significantly affect coagulation, while dilution with HES 670/0.75 and HES 130/0.4 caused a dose-dependent significant decrease in CR (1:3 HES 670/0.75, P = 0.007; 1:10 HES 670/0.75, P = 0.002; 1:3 HES130/0.4, P < 0.0001; and 1:10 HES 130/0.4, P = 0.0003) and PF (1:3 HES 670/0.75, P < 0.0001; 1:10 HES 670/0.75, P < 0.0001; 1:3 HES130/0.4, P < 0.0001; and 1:10 HES 130/0.4, P = 0.0015).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Dilution of canine blood with HES 670/0.75 and HES 130/0.4, at clinically relevant doses (10 and 30 mL/kg), led to significant hypocoagulability beyond dilutional effect. This was, in part, due to impaired PF, which was significantly greater with HES 670/0.75. Further research using DVC to assess the effects of HES on coagulation in dogs, ideally with clinical conditions warranting HES administration, is needed.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 6-month-old sexually intact male domestic shorthair cat was referred for evaluation of a heart murmur and ventricular septal defect (VSD).

CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination revealed a grade 5/6 right apical systolic heart murmur. Findings on thoracic radiography were consistent with moderate right and left ventricular enlargement, left atrial enlargement, and enlargement of the pulmonary arteries and veins; an interstitial pulmonary pattern was also evident. Echocardiography revealed a perimembranous VSD with left-to-right shunting combined with trace mitral valve regurgitation. The cat later developed a dry cough, the intensity of the heart murmur increased to grade 6/6, and signs of left-sided congestive heart failure developed.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Medical treatment included enalapril maleate and furosemide. When the cat's condition worsened despite medical treatment, palliative pulmonary artery banding was performed. During surgery, blood pressure in the pulmonary artery was measured with a pulmonary artery catheter, and pulmonary artery banding was successfully achieved with a polytetrafluoroethylene band and hemoclips. The pulmonary-to-systemic blood flow ratio was reduced from 3 to 1.5, and signs of congestive heart failure resolved within 2 weeks after surgery.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that cats with a VSD and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio > 3 or with congestive heart failure attributable to a VSD could be considered candidates for palliative pulmonary artery banding to alleviate clinical signs. However, further investigation into long-term prognosis with objective outcome measurements and with multiple cases is needed. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2019;254:723–727)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION A 7-year-old castrated male Italian Greyhound (dog 1) and an approximately 1-year-old female Labrador Retriever (dog 2) were evaluated because of respiratory distress 8 and 10 days, respectively, after a tornado.

CLINICAL FINDINGS No obvious external injuries were identified auscultation revealed decreased bronchovesicular sounds in the affected hemithorax of both dogs. Clinicopathologic changes were mild, with evidence of inflammation in both dogs. Thoracic radiography of both dogs revealed pneumothorax and pleural effusion with effacement of the diaphragm; findings on CT included severe pulmonary atelectasis of affected lung lobes with normal bronchial tree configurtion and no evidence of diaphragmatic hernia.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Exploratory thoracotomy of both dogs confirmed CT findings Pulmonary parenchymal damage consistent with a large rupture was found in both patients. A large hematoma was adhered to the ruptured lung lobe of dog 1. Grossly affected lung tissue was removed; histologic examination revealed atelectasis, pulmonary fib osis, thrombosis, and minimal (dog 1) to marked (dog 2) inflammation Microbial culture of lung tissue yielded no growth for dog 1 and Streptococcus spp and Escherichia coli susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for dog 2. Dog 1 had a recurrence of pneumothorax treated by drainage with a thoracostomy tube 1 month after surgery. Eighteen months after surgery, both dogs were reportedly doing well.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Development of clinical signs after a tornado, together with clinical, diagnostic imaging, surgical, and histologic findings led to a presumptive diagnosis of pulmonary barotrauma for both dogs. Long-term outcome for these dogs, treated at a referral hospital, was good.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine rate of recurrence of disk herniation in dogs that underwent percutaneous laser disk ablation (PLDA) because of a previous episode of suspected or confirmed thoracolumbar intervertebral disk herniation (IVDH).

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 303 dogs that underwent PLDA and for which a minimum of 3 years of follow-up information was available (n = 294) or for which recurrence was documented within 3 years after the procedure (9).

PROCEDURES Information on signalment, previous episodes of IVDH, specifics of the PLDA procedure, and recurrence was obtained from the medical records. Owners were contacted to complete a questionnaire regarding outcome and recurrence.

RESULTS 60 of the 303 (19.8%) dogs had an episode of suspected or confirmed IVDH after undergoing PLDA, but only 11 of the 303 (3.6%) dogs had a recurrence of IVDH confirmed by means of CT or MRI and hemilaminectomy. Recurrence rate following PLDA was not significantly different between dogs that had been treated medically for previous episodes of IVDH and dogs that had been treated surgically. Overall, 270 of 286 (94.4%) owners reported that their dog was the same (109 [38.1%]) or improved (161 [56.3%]) immediately after PLDA, and 265 (92.7%) owners rated their satisfaction with the procedure as ≥ 9 on a scale from 1 (completely dissatisfied) to 10 (completely satisfied).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that PLDA was a relatively safe, minimally invasive procedure associated with a low rate of recurrence of disk herniation when performed in dogs with a history of previous episodes of suspected or confirmed IVDH.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe outcomes for dogs after treatment of craniodorsal hip luxation with closed reduction and Ehmer sling placement and investigate potential risk factors for sling-associated tissue injury or reluxation of the affected hip at or near the time of sling removal.

DESIGN Retrospective multicenter cohort study.

ANIMALS 92 dogs.

PROCEDURES Case information was solicited from 10 veterinary medical facilities through electronic communications. Data on patient demographic information, cause of injury, presence of concurrent injuries, details of Ehmer sling placement and management, and outcome at sling removal were collected. Data were analyzed for associations with outcomes.

RESULTS 40 of 92 (43.5%) dogs had reluxation of the affected hip joint at or near the time of sling removal. Odds of reluxation occurring for dogs that had the initial injury attributed to trauma were 5 times those for dogs without known trauma (OR, 5.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 18.7). Forty-six (50%) dogs had soft tissue injuries secondary to sling use; 17 of these dogs had injuries classified as severe, including 1 dog that required limb amputation. Odds of severe sling injury for dogs that had poor owner compliance with home care instructions noted in the record, those that had the sling placed by an intern rather than a board-certified surgeon or resident, and those that were noted to have a soiled or wet bandage on ≥ 1 occasion were 12.5, 4.0, and 5.7 times those for dogs without these findings, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Placement of an Ehmer sling following closed reduction of a craniodorsal hip luxation had a low success rate and high complication rate.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the durations of surgery and anesthesia and the likelihoods of short- and long-term postoperative complications between cats positioned in sternal recumbency versus dorsal recumbency for perineal urethrostomy (PU).

ANIMALS

247 client-owned cats that underwent PU between January 2004 and December 2015 at 6 veterinary teaching hospitals and 1 private veterinary referral hospital.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed, and signalment, presenting complaints, previous history of urethral obstruction or PU, diet fed, medications administered, indication for PU, durations of surgery and anesthesia for PU, suture type and size, suture pattern for skin closure, and short- and long-term postoperative complications were recorded. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify differences in durations of surgery and anesthesia and the likelihoods of short- and long-term complications between cats positioned in sternal recumbency and those positioned in dorsal recumbency.

RESULTS

Patient position was not associated with durations of surgery and anesthesia for PU, even if a concurrent cystotomy was necessary or the patient required repositioning from sternal to dorsal recumbency. Likewise, patient position was not associated with the likelihood of short- and long-term complications.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The observed lack of differences in outcomes between sternal and dorsal recumbency suggested that logistic considerations and personal preference can continue to guide veterinarians when positioning cats for PU.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate outcomes of dogs with parathyroid carcinoma (PTC) treated by surgical excision and to describe the incidence of postoperative hypocalcemia, degree of hypocalcemia, duration of hospitalization, duration of calcium supplementation, and survival time

ANIMALS

100 client-owned dogs with PTC admitted to academic, referral veterinary institutions.

PROCEDURES

In a retrospective multi-institutional study, medical records of dogs undergoing surgical excision of PTC between 2010 to 2019 were reviewed. Signalment, relevant medical history, clinical signs, clinicopathologic testing, imaging, surgical findings, intraoperative complications, histologic examination, and survival time were recorded.

RESULTS

100 dogs with PTC were included, and 96 dogs had clinical or incidental hypercalcemia. Common clinical signs included polyuria (44%), polydipsia (43%), hind limb paresis (22%), lethargy (21%), and hyporexia (20%). Cervical ultrasonography detected a parathyroid nodule in 91 of 91 dogs, with a single nodule in 70.3% (64/91), 2 nodules in 25.3% (23/91), and ≥ 3 nodules in 4 (4/91)% of dogs. Hypercalcemia resolved in 89 of 96 dogs within 7 days after surgery. Thirty-four percent of dogs developed hypocalcemia, on the basis of individual analyzer ranges, within 1 week after surgery. One dog had metastatic PTC to the prescapular lymph node, and 3 dogs were euthanized for refractory postoperative hypocalcemia. Estimated 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 84%, 65%, and 51% respectively, with a median survival time of 2 years.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Excision of PTC results in resolution of hypercalcemia and excellent long-term tumor control. Surgical excision of PTC is recommended because of resolution of hypercalcemia and a good long-term prognosis. Future prospective studies and long-term follow-up are needed to further assess primary tumor recurrence, metastasis, and incidence of postoperative hypocalcemia.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association