Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Danielle F. Mauragis x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objectives

To determine normal cecal emptying curves for liquid- and solid-phase radiolabeled markers and to further define myoelectric patterns of the ileum, cecum, and colon in healthy ponies.

Animals

6 adult ponies.

Procedure

A cecal cannula and 12 bipolar Ag-AgCl recording electrodes were sutured to the ileum, cecum, and right ventral colon of the ponies. Radioisotopes, indium 111-labeled diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid (111In-DTPA) and technetium 99m (99mTc)-labeled sulfur colloid bound to egg albumen, were introduced through the cannula directly into the cecal body. Movement of these markers from the cecum was monitored by a gamma camera, and power exponential clearance curves were generated. Myoelectric data were collected before and after IV administration of isotonic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, and were analyzed for spike burst (SB) rate, relative activity index, and mean burst duration. Myoelectric complexes were identified from observation of chart recordings or compressed, digitized data.

Results

Clearance curves were generated for liquid (111In-DTPA)- and solid (99mTc)-phase markers. Marker types were not different with respect to lag phase, but liquid markers emptied at a slightly faster rate than did solids. Baseline values were calculated after saline solution administration for each of the myoelectric variables investigated. A relation between ileal, cecal, and colonic myoelectric activity was identified. Activity consistent with the previously described colonic migrating myoelectric complex in the pelvic flexure was identified in the right ventral colon.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Baseline data on normal cecal emptying was obtained; this technique could be used to evaluate the effect of postulated motility-modifying treatments used in equine practice. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:313–319)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine the effects of 3 sedative protocols (butorphanol and diazepam [BD] IV; acepromazine and butorphanol [AB] IV; diazepam and ketamine [DK] IV) on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as measured by 99mTc DTPA nuclear scintigraphy and to compare them with GFR measured without sedation. Cardiovascular, respiratory, and sedative effects of each protocol also were measured.

Animals

12 adult male Walker Hounds.

Procedure

Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures and heart and respiratory rates were measured before, during, and after scintigraphic measurement of GFR.

Results

Difference in GFR was not significant between any of the sedative regimens and the control. The DK protocol caused significant increases in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure; compared with the AB and BD protocols, it caused significant increases in heart rate versus all protocols, and was associated with the lowest mean GFR (2.80 ml/min/kg of body weight). The AB protocol caused significant decreases in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures, compared with DK and the nonsedation protocols. Mean GFR for the BD protocol was 2.94 ml/min/kg, and was 3.13 ml/min/kg for the AB and the nonsedation protocols. The AB protocol provided the best sedation with minimal additional restraint required. The BD and nonsedation protocols often were associated with substantial dog movement. The DK protocol induced inadequate duration of immobilization (< 10 minutes) in some dogs and excitement in others.

Conclusion

GFR measurements obtained with any of the sedative protocols were not significantly different, compared with measurements in awake dogs. The AB protocol provides the best sedative effects and was associated with GFR values identical to those in awake dogs. Systemic hypotension caused by acepromazine did not decrease GFR in clinically normal dogs. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:446–450)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research