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  • Author or Editor: Daniel L. Gustafson x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate antioxidant capacity and inflammatory cytokine gene expression in horses fed silibinin complexed with phospholipid.

Animals—5 healthy horses.

Procedures—Horses consumed increasing orally administered doses of silibinin phospholipid during 4 nonconsecutive weeks (0 mg/kg, 6.5 mg/kg, 13 mg/kg, and 26 mg/kg of body weight, twice daily for 7 days each week). Dose-related changes in plasma antioxidant capacity, peripheral blood cell glutathione concentration and antioxidant enzyme activities, and blood cytokine gene expression were evaluated.

Results—Plasma antioxidant capacity increased throughout the study period with increasing dose. Red blood cell nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase I activity decreased significantly with increasing doses of silibinin phospholipid. No significant differences were identified in glutathione peroxidase activity, reduced glutathione or oxidized glutathione concentrations, or expression of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1, or interleukin-2.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Minor alterations in antioxidant capacity of healthy horses that consumed silibinin phospholipid occurred and suggest that further study in horses with liver disease is indicated.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the oral bioavailability, single and multidose pharmacokinetics, and safety of silibinin, a milk thistle derivative, in healthy horses.

Animals—9 healthy horses.

Procedures—Horses were initially administered silibinin IV and silibinin phospholipid orally in feed and via nasogastric tube. Five horses then consumed increasing orally administered doses of silibinin phospholipid during 4 nonconsecutive weeks (0 mg/kg, 6.5 mg/kg, 13 mg/kg, and 26 mg/kg of body weight, twice daily for 7 days each week).

Results—Bioavailability of orally administered silibinin phospholipid was 0.6% PO in feed and 2.9% via nasogastric tube. During the multidose phase, silibinin had nonlinear pharmacokinetics. Despite this, silibinin did not accumulate when given twice daily for 7 days at the evaluated doses. Dose-limiting toxicosis was not observed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Silibinin phospholipid was safe, although poorly bio-available, in horses. Further study is indicated in horses with hepatic disease.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of 2 doses of orbifloxacin in rabbits.

ANIMALS 6 healthy purpose-bred adult female New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

PROCEDURES Each of 3 rabbits received orbifloxacin at either 10 or 20 mg/kg, PO. Then, after a 1-week washout period, they received the same dose IV. Blood samples were collected from each rabbit at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours after drug administration. Plasma orbifloxacin concentration was measured with liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental analysis for data obtained following PO administration and noncompartmental and compartmental analyses for data obtained following IV administration.

RESULTS Following oral administration, the mean ± SD peak plasma orbifloxacin concentration was 1.66 ± 0.51 μg/mL for rabbits administered the 10 mg/kg dose and 3.00 ± 0.97 μg/mL for rabbits administered the 20 mg/kg dose and was attained at 2 hours after drug administration. The mean ± SD half-life of orbifloxacin in plasma was 7.3 ± 1.1 hours for rabbits administered the 10 mg/kg dose and 8.6 ± 0.55 hours for rabbits administered the 20 mg/kg dose. Mean bioavailability was 52.5% for rabbits administered the 10 mg/kg dose and 46.5% for rabbits administered the 20 mg/kg dose.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results provided pharmacokinetic properties for 2 doses (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) of orbifloxacin oral suspension in rabbits. Further studies are necessary to determine the protein-binding activity of orbifloxacin in rabbits before dosages for the treatment of common pathogens in this species are recommended.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the effect of oral cannabidiol (CBD) administration in addition to conventional antiepileptic treatment on seizure frequency in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

DESIGN

Randomized blinded controlled clinical trial.

ANIMALS

26 client-owned dogs with intractable idiopathic epilepsy.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were randomly assigned to a CBD (n = 12) or placebo (14) group. The CBD group received CBD-infused oil (2.5 mg/kg [1.1 mg/lb], PO) twice daily for 12 weeks in addition to existing antiepileptic treatments, and the placebo group received noninfused oil under the same conditions. Seizure activity, adverse effects, and plasma CBD concentrations were compared between groups.

RESULTS

2 dogs in the CBD group developed ataxia and were withdrawn from the study. After other exclusions, 9 dogs in the CBD group and 7 in the placebo group were included in the analysis. Dogs in the CBD group had a significant (median change, 33%) reduction in seizure frequency, compared with the placebo group. However, the proportion of dogs considered responders to treatment (≥ 50% decrease in seizure activity) was similar between groups. Plasma CBD concentrations were correlated with reduction in seizure frequency. Dogs in the CBD group had a significant increase in serum alkaline phosphatase activity. No adverse behavioral effects were reported by owners.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although a significant reduction in seizure frequency was achieved for dogs in the CBD group, the proportion of responders was similar between groups. Given the correlation between plasma CBD concentration and seizure frequency, additional research is warranted to determine whether a higher dosage of CBD would be effective in reducing seizure activity by ≥ 50%.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To characterize pharmacokinetics of cyclophosphamide and 4-hydoxycyclophosphamide (4-OHCP) in the plasma of healthy cats after oral, IV, and IP administration of cyclophosphamide.

ANIMALS 6 healthy adult cats.

PROCEDURES Cats were randomly assigned to receive cyclophosphamide (200 mg/m2) via each of 3 routes of administration (oral, IV, and IP); there was a 30-day washout period between successive treatments. Plasma samples were obtained at various time points for up to 8 hours after administration. Samples were treated with semicarbazide hydrochloride to trap the 4-OHCP in stable form, which allowed for cyclophosphamide and trapped 4-OHCP to be simultaneously measured by use of tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined from drug concentration-versus-time data for both cyclophosphamide and 4-OHCP.

RESULTS Cyclophosphamide was tolerated well regardless of route of administration. Pharmacokinetic parameters for 4-OHCP were similar after oral, IV, and IP administration. Area under the concentration-time curve for cyclophosphamide was lower after oral administration than after IV or IP administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Cyclophosphamide can be administered interchangeably to cats as oral, IV, and IP formulations, which should provide benefits with regard to cost and ease of administration to certain feline patients.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess drug-drug interactions between cannabidiol (CBD) and phenobarbital (PB) when simultaneously administered to healthy dogs.

ANIMALS

9 healthy, purpose bred Beagles.

PROCEDURES

A 3-phase prospective, randomized pharmacokinetic (PK) interaction study of CBD and PB was performed as follows: phase 1, CBD PK determination and evaluation of CBD tolerability by 3 single-dose CBD (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, and 20 mg/kg) protocols followed by 2-week CBD dosing; phase 2, a single-dose, 3-way, crossover PK study of CBD (10 mg/kg), PB (4 mg/kg), or CBD (10 mg/kg) administration plus PB (4 mg/kg); and phase 3, evaluation of chronic PB (4 mg/kg, q 30 d) administration followed by single-dose CBD (10 mg/kg) PK study.

RESULTS

Although there were variations in CBD PK variables in dogs receiving CBD alone or in conjunction with PB, significance differences in CBD PK variables were not found. No significant difference was observed in PB PK variables of dogs receiving PB alone or with CBD. During chronic CBD administration, mild gastrointestinal signs were observed in 5 dogs. At daily CBD doses of 10 to 20 mg/kg/d, hypoxia was observed in 5 dogs and increased serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities (range, 301 to 978 U/L) was observed in 4 dogs. A significant increase in ALP activity was observed with chronic administration of CBD during phase 1 between day 0 and day 14.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

No significant PK interactions were found between CBD and PB. Dose escalation of CBD or adjustment of PB in dogs is not recommended on the basis of findings of this study.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of intratumoral injection of a hyaluronan-cisplatin nanoconjugate on local and systemic platinum concentrations and systemic toxicosis.

Animals—5 dogs with spontaneous soft tissue sarcomas (STSs).

Procedures—For each dog, approximately 1.5 mL of hyaluronan nanocarrier conjugated with 20 mg of cisplatin was injected into an external STS. Blood samples were collected immediately before (0 hours) and at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 24, and 96 hours after hyaluronan-cisplatin injection for pharmacokinetic analyses. Urine samples were obtained at 0 and at 96 hours after hyaluronan-cisplatin injection for urinalysis. Each treated STS and its sentinel lymph nodes were surgically removed 96 hours after the hyaluronan-cisplatin injection. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to measure platinum concentrations in blood samples, tumors, and lymph nodes.

Results—No tissue reactions were detected 96 hours after hyaluronan-cisplatin injection. Mean ± SD area under the curve, peak concentration, and terminal half-life for unbound (plasma) and total (serum) platinum were 774.6 ± 221.1 ng•h/mL and 3,562.1 ± 2,031.1 ng•h/mL, 56.5 ± 20.9 ng/mL and 81.6 ± 40.4 ng/mL, and 33.6 ± 16.1 hours and 51.2 ± 29.1 hours, respectively. Platinum concentrations ranged from 3,325 to 8,229 ng/g in STSs and 130 to 6,066 ng/g in STS-associated lymph nodes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intratumoral injection of the hyaluronan-cisplatin nanoconjugate was well tolerated in treated dogs. Following intratumoral hyaluronan-cisplatin injection, platinum concentration was 1,000-fold and 100-fold greater within treated tumors and tumor-draining lymphatics, respectively, compared with that in plasma.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of dietary n-3 fatty acids on the pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin in dogs with lymphoma.

Animals—23 dogs with lymphoma in stages IIIa, IVa, and Va.

Procedure—Dogs receiving doxorubicin chemotherapy were randomly allocated to receive food with a high (test group) or low (control group) content of n-3 fatty acids. Serum doxorubicin and doxorubicinol concentrations were measured via high-performance liquid chromatography before and 6 to 9 weeks after initiation of the diets. Lymph node concentrations of doxorubicin were assessed 6 hours after the initial treatment. Dogs' body composition was assessed by means of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans.

Results—No significant differences in doxorubicin pharmacokinetics were detected between treatment groups. Significant differences existed between the first and second sampling times among all dogs for area under the curve, maximum serum concentration, and clearance. Differences in body composition did not affect measured pharmacokinetic variables. The terminal elimination half-life was longer in dogs in which a long-term remission was achieved than in dogs that did not have remission.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dietary supplementation of n-3 fatty acids is common in veterinary patients with neoplasia, but supplementation did not affect doxorubicin pharmacokinetics in this population of dogs. Explanations for the beneficial effects of n-3 fatty acids other than alterations in the pharmacokinetics of chemotherapy drugs should be investigated. Dogs may metabolize drugs differently prior to remission of lymphoma than when in remission. The pharmacokinetics of doxorubicin at the time of the first administration may predict response to treatment.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of orally administered rapamycin in healthy dogs.

ANIMALS 5 healthy purpose-bred hounds.

PROCEDURES The study consisted of 2 experiments. In experiment 1, each dog received rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after administration. In experiment 2, each dog received rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg, PO) once daily for 5 days; blood samples were obtained immediately before and at 3, 6, 24, 27, 30, 48, 51, 54, 72, 75, 78, 96, 96.5, 97, 98, 100, 102, 108, 120, 144, and 168 hours after the first dose. Blood rapamycin concentration was determined by a validated liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry assay. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by compartmental and noncompartmental analyses.

RESULTS Mean ± SD blood rapamycin terminal half-life, area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 48 hours after dosing, and maximum concentration were 38.7 ± 12.7 h, 140 ± 23.9 ng•h/mL, and 8.39 ± 1.73 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 1, and 99.5 ± 89.5 h, 126 ± 27.1 ng•h/mL, and 5.49 ± 1.99 ng/mL, respectively, for experiment 2. Pharmacokinetic parameters for rapamycin after administration of 5 daily doses differed significantly from those after administration of 1 dose.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that oral administration of low-dose (0.1 mg/kg) rapamycin to healthy dogs achieved blood concentrations measured in nanograms per milliliter. The optimal dose and administration frequency of rapamcyin required to achieve therapeutic effects in tumor-bearing dogs, as well as toxicity after chronic dosing, need to be determined.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research