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  • Author or Editor: Daniel J. Lopez x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To quantify the relative risk of intestinal dehiscence in dogs undergoing intestinal resection and anastomosis (IRA), compared with enterotomy, for surgical management of small intestinal foreign bodies, and to evaluate the association between nasogastric tube placement for early enteral nutrition (EEN) and hospitalization time.

ANIMALS

211 dogs undergoing 227 surgeries for intestinal foreign body removal.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed for dogs undergoing a single-site sutured enterotomy or IRA for foreign body intestinal obstruction between May 2008 and April 2018. Multivariable logistic regression was used to quantify the association between surgical procedure and dehiscence. Multiple linear regression was used to quantify the association of nasogastric tube placement with total hospitalization time.

RESULTS

Dehiscence rates were 3.8% (7/183) and 18.2% (8/44) for enterotomy and IRA, respectively. Overall dehiscence rate for all surgeries was 6.6% (15/227). The odds of intestinal dehiscence for IRA were 6.09 times (95% CI, 1.89 to 19.58) the odds for enterotomy. An American Society of Anesthesiologists score > 3 (OR, 4.49; 95% CI, 1.43 to 14.11) and an older age (OR, 1.02 [95% CI, 1.01 to 1.02] for each 1-month increase in age) were significantly associated with greater odds of intestinal dehiscence, regardless of surgical procedure. Placement of a nasogastric tube was not associated with intestinal dehiscence or decreased total hospitalization time when controlling for the year of surgery.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Patients undergoing IRA were at a significantly higher risk of intestinal dehiscence, compared with patients undergoing enterotomy. Although this finding should not be used to recommend enterotomy over IRA, this information may be useful in guiding owner expectations and postoperative monitoring.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To identify risk factors associated with surgical site infection (SSI) in dogs following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO).

DESIGN Retrospective cohort study.

ANIMALS 320 dogs that underwent unilateral or bilateral TPLO (n = 405 procedures) between 2007 and 2015 and were reexamined by a veterinarian at least once ≥ 8 weeks after the procedure.

PROCEDURES Data were extracted from medical records regarding signalment, TPLO procedure details, medical history of dermatitis, and SSI status. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with SSI development.

RESULTS An SSI developed following 34 (8.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.1% to 11.5%) procedures. Prophylactic antimicrobial administration was provided following 36.8% (n = 149) of procedures. For 71 (17.5%) procedures, the dog had dermatitis at the time of surgery; 12 of these procedures involved dermatitis at the surgical site. The incidence of SSI following the 12 procedures for dogs with dermatitis at the surgical site was 16.7% (2/12 [95% CI, 3.3% to 54.3%]) and was 10.2% (6/59 [95% CI, 4.5% to 21.3%]) for dogs with dermatitis elsewhere; however, these differences in incidence were not significant. On multivariable analysis, German Shepherd Dogs (vs other breeds), meniscectomy (vs no meniscectomy), and attending surgeon having performed ≤ 20 (vs > 20) procedures during the study period were associated with increased odds of SSI.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE SSI following TPLO was associated with the German Shepherd breed, meniscectomy, and surgeon. Prospective studies are needed to investigate the mechanisms underlying these associations.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate outcomes in cats undergoing subtotal colectomy for the treatment of idiopathic megacolon and to determine whether removal versus nonremoval of the ileocecocolic junction (ICJ) was associated with differences in outcome.

ANIMALS

166 client-owned cats.

PROCEDURES

For this retrospective cohort study, medical records databases of 18 participating veterinary hospitals were searched to identify records of cats with idiopathic megacolon treated by subtotal colectomy from January 2000 to December 2018. Data collection included perioperative and surgical variables, complications, outcome, and owner perception of the procedure. Data were analyzed for associations with outcomes of interest, and Kaplan-Meier survival time analysis was performed.

RESULTS

Major perioperative complications occurred in 9.9% (15/151) of cats, and 14% (12/87) of cats died as a direct result of treatment or complications of megacolon. The median survival time was not reached. Cats with (vs without) a body condition score < 4/9 (hazard ratio [HR], 5.97), preexisting heart disease (HR, 3.21), major perioperative complications (HR, 27.8), or long-term postoperative liquid feces (HR, 10.4) had greater hazard of shorter survival time. Constipation recurrence occurred in 32% (24/74) of cats at a median time of 344 days and was not associated with retention versus removal of the ICJ; however, ICJ removal was associated with long-term liquid feces (OR, 3.45), and a fair or poor outcome on owner assessment (OR, 3.6).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that subtotal colectomy was associated with long survival times and a high rate of owner satisfaction. Removal of the ICJ was associated with less favorable outcomes in cats of the present study.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association