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SUMMARY

Ten adult dogs (5 Beagles and 5 mixed-breed dogs) were inoculated IV with canine platelets containing Ehrlichia platys. Inclusions and morulae of E platys developed in platelets of infected dogs at 10 to 14 days after inoculation, followed by marked thrombocytopenia at 14 to 21 days. Parasitemia and marked thrombocytopenia recurred at 24 to 28 days after inoculation. Increased numbers of megakaryocytes were observed in marrow aspirate smears from infected dogs, indicative of regenerative thrombocytopenia. Prior to infection, platelet-rich plasma from these dogs was determined to have similar aggregatory response to arachidonate. After infection with E platys, the aggregatory response of platelet-rich plasma to collagen or 3 dilutions of adenosine diphosphate was evaluated. A statistically significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of platelet aggregatory response to the lowest dilution of adenosine diphosphate was detected for mixed-breed dogs, whereas aggregation responses were unchanged in Beagles. Results indicate that platelet activation may occur in dogs with acute ehrlichial infection.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

The toxicity of Riddell groundsel (Senecio riddellii) gavaged to calves at a known lethal rate was compared with the toxicity of riddelliine and riddelliine N-oxide, the pyrrolizidine alkaloids isolated from the plant, which were fed by intraruminal infusion. Doses of the alkaloids were adjusted to the amount determined to be in the plant and fed individually and in combination. The relative toxicosis in the calves was measured by clinical signs, serum enzyme changes, survival time to morbidity, and histologic changes.

Calves fed Senecio riddellii by gavage for 20 consecutive days to provide 45 mg of total pyrrolizidine alkaloids/kg of body weight/d developed clinical signs and serum enzyme changes typical of seneciosis, with 100% morbidity. However, calves receiving riddelliine at 4.5 mg/kg/d for 20 days had neither serum enzyme changes nor clinical signs of pyrrolizidine alkaloidosis. Calves treated with riddelliine N-oxide (40.5 mg/kg/d), and with riddelliine (4.5 mg/kg/d) and riddelliine N-oxide (40.5 mg/kg/d) in combination, had 100% morbidity, although the latter group had fewer liver lesions.

These results establish that the N-oxide form of the alkaloid alone is capable of inducing typical Senecio toxicosis in cattle and that the free base level of the plant cannot be considered to be the sole factor in assessing the toxicity of S riddellii.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association