Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Daisuke Fujita x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate outcome of limb fracture repair in rabbits.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 139 client-owned rabbits with limb fractures treated between 2007 and 2015.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed for information on fracture location, fracture treatment, and time to fracture healing.

RESULTS 25 rabbits had fractures involving the distal aspects of the limbs (ie, metacarpal or metatarsal bones, phalanges, and calcaneus or talus). Fractures were treated in 23 of these 25 rabbits (external coaptation, n = 17; external skeletal fixation, 4; and intramedullary pinning, 2) and healed in all 23, with a median healing time of 28 days (range, 20 to 45 days). One hundred ten rabbits had long bone fractures, and fractures were treated in 100 of the 110 (external skeletal fixation, n = 89; bone plating, 1; intramedullary pinning, 3; and external coaptation, 7). The percentage of fractures that healed was significantly lower for open (14/18) than for closed (26/26) tibial fractures and was significantly lower for femoral (19/26) and treated humeral (4/6) fractures than for radial (23/24) or closed tibial (26/26) fractures. Micro-CT was used to assess fracture realignment during external skeletal fixator application and to evaluate fracture healing.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The prognosis for rabbits with limb fractures was good, with fractures healing in most rabbits following fracture repair (109/123). Micro-CT was useful in assessing fracture realignment and evaluating fracture healing.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the usefulness of diffusion and perfusion MRI of the cerebrum in cats with familial spontaneous epilepsy (FSECs) and identify microstructural and functional deficit zones in affected cats.

ANIMALS 19 FSECs and 12 healthy cats.

PROCEDURES Diffusion-weighted, diffusion tensor, and perfusion-weighted MRI of the cerebrum were performed during interictal periods in FSECs. Imaging findings were compared between FSECs and control cats. Diffusion (apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy) and perfusion (relative cerebral blood volume [rCBV], relative cerebral blood flow [rCBF], and mean transit time) variables were measured bilaterally in the hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, parietal cortex gray matter, and subcortical white matter. Asymmetry of these variables in each region was also evaluated and compared between FSECs and control cats.

RESULTS The apparent diffusion coefficient of the total amygdala of FSECs was significantly higher, compared with that of control cats. The fractional anisotropy of the right side and total hippocampus of FSECs was significantly lower, compared with that of control cats. The left and right sides and total hippocampal rCBV and rCBF were significantly lower in FSECs than in control cats. The rCBV and rCBF of the parietal cortex gray matter in FSECs were significantly lower than in control cats.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In FSECs, diffusion and perfusion MRI detected microstructural changes and hypoperfusion (lowered function) in the cerebrum during interictal periods from that of healthy cats. These findings indicated that diffusion and perfusion MRI may be useful for noninvasive evaluation of epileptogenic foci in cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate epilepsy-related neuropathologic changes in cats of a familial spontaneous epileptic strain (ie, familial spontaneous epileptic cats [FSECs]).

ANIMALS 6 FSECs, 9 age-matched unrelated healthy control cats, and 2 nonaffected (without clinical seizures)dams and 1 nonaffected sire of FSECs.

PROCEDURES Immunohistochemical analyses were used to evaluate hippocampal sclerosis, amygdaloid sclerosis, mossy fiber sprouting, and granule cell pathological changes. Values were compared between FSECs and control cats.

RESULTS Significantly fewer neurons without gliosis were detected in the third subregion of the cornu ammonis (CA) of the dorsal and ventral aspects of the hippocampus as well as the central nucleus of the amygdala in FSECs versus control cats. Gliosis without neuronal loss was also observed in the CA4 subregion of the ventral aspect of the hippocampus. No changes in mossy fiber sprouting and granule cell pathological changes were detected. Moreover, similar changes were observed in the dams and sire without clinical seizures, although to a lesser extent.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that the lower numbers of neurons in the CA3 subregion of the hippocampus and the central nucleus of the amygdala were endophenotypes of familial spontaneous epilepsy in cats. In contrast to results of other veterinary medicine reports, severe epilepsy-related neuropathologic changes (eg, hippocampal sclerosis, amygdaloid sclerosis, mossy fiber sprouting, and granule cell pathological changes) were not detected in FSECs. Despite the use of a small number of cats with infrequent seizures, these findings contributed new insights on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of genetic-related epilepsy in cats.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize bone fractures and the usefulness of micro-CT for imaging fractures in pet rabbits.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—210 client-owned rabbits with bone fractures.

Procedures—Medical records of rabbits evaluated for bone fractures from 2007 through 2013 were examined. Information was collected on signalment and nature of fractures, and radiographic and micro-CT images of fractures were reviewed.

Results—Almost half (n = 95 [47.7%]) of fractures were in rabbits < 3 years old. Accidental fall was the most common cause. Vertebral fracture was the most common type of fracture with a nonneoplastic cause (n = 46 [23.2%]) and was most common in the L4-L7 region. The tibia was the most common site for limb fracture among all fractures with a nonneoplastic cause (45 [22.7%]). Twelve (5.7%) fractures had a neoplastic cause, and 7 of these were associated with metastatic uterine adenocarcinoma. Females were significantly more likely to have a fracture caused by neoplasia than were males. Compared with radiography, micro-CT provided more detailed fracture information, particularly for complicated fractures or structures (eg, skull, pelvic, vertebral, and comminuted limb fractures).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings were useful for understanding the nature of fractures in pet rabbits and supported the use of micro-CT versus radiography for fracture detection and evaluation.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association