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History and Physical Examination Findings

A 9-year-old 8.7-kg (19.1-lb) spayed female Jack Russell Terrier cross was referred to the dentistry and oral surgery service of a veterinary medical teaching hospital (VMTH) for evaluation of a mass that grossly spanned most of the right mandible. The client had noticed thickening of the area 4 months prior to the examination. At that time, the dog was treated by the primary care veterinarian with extraction of the right mandibular first and second molar teeth and was administered clindamycin hydrochloride (4.3 mg/kg [2 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h) for 7 days. Approximately 2 weeks

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History and Physical Examination Findings

A 20-month-old 18-kg (39.6-lb) spayed female English Springer Spaniel was referred to a veterinary medical teaching hospital (VMTH) for recurrent extraoral swelling in the caudal left mandibular region and an intraoral draining tract near the left mandibular ramus. Seven months earlier, the referring veterinarian evaluated the dog for left-sided facial swelling, oral bleeding, and signs of oral pain. Mild left-sided facial swelling, a suspected abscess in the caudal left pharyngeal area, and ipsilateral secretion of blood-tinged purulent saliva were observed. Enrofloxacin (3.8 mg/kg [1.7 mg/lb], PO, q 24 h for 10 days) was prescribed. Periodontal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the radiographic outcome of root canal treatment (RCT) in dogs and compare outcomes with those reported for a previous study performed at the same institution in 2002.

ANIMALS

204 dogs representing 281 teeth that underwent RCT.

PROCEDURES

The medical record database of a veterinary teaching hospital was searched to identify dogs that underwent RCT between 2001 and 2018. Only dogs that had undergone at least 1 radiographic recheck appointment a minimum of 50 days after RCT were included in the study. Dental radiographs were reviewed. Treatment was considered successful if the periapical periodontal ligament space was within reference limits and preexisting external inflammatory root resorption (EIRR), if present, had stabilized. Treatment was considered to show no evidence of failure (NEF) if preoperative EIRR had stabilized and any preoperative periapical lucency (PAL) remained the same or had decreased in size but had not completely resolved. Treatment was considered to have failed if EIRR or a PAL developed after RCT, if a preoperative PAL increased in size, or if preexisting EIRR progressed.

RESULTS

Follow-up time ranged from 52 to 3,245 days (mean, 437 days). RCT was classified as successful for 199 (71%) teeth, NEF for 71 (25%) teeth, and failed for 11 (4%) teeth.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results showed that almost 2 decades after RCT outcome in dogs was first evaluated, during which time numerous advances in dental materials and techniques had been made, the success rate of RCT was virtually unchanged.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association