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  • Author or Editor: D. R. Wagner x
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Abstract

Objective—To assess heritability and mode of inheritance for hypoadrenocorticism in Bearded Collies.

Animals—635 Bearded Collies.

Procedure—Dogs were classified as affected by hypoadrenocorticism or unaffected. Phenotypic and pedigree data were analyzed. Heritability was estimated by use of Bayesian statistical methods. Regressive logistic models for complex segregation analyses were used to characterize mode of inheritance.

Results—Hypoadrenocorticism was diagnosed in 60 (9.4%) dogs. Heritability of hypoadrenocorticism was estimated to be 0.76 with both sexes affected with equal probability. Evaluation of the pedigrees did not support a Mendelian autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Evidence from the complex segregation analysis for a single locus of large effect on hypoadrenocorticism was not convincing.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hypoadrenocorticism in Bearded Collies is highly heritable. Although a precise genetic mechanism responsible for inheritance of the disorder remains undetermined, breeding decisions must include consideration of the genetic likelihood of passing on this deleterious disorder to offspring of affected dams and sires. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:643–647).

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To estimate seroprevalence of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) infection among adult dairy cows in Colorado and determine herd-level factors associated with the risk that individual cows would be seropositive.

Design—Cross-sectional observational study.

Animals—10,280 adult (≥ 2 years old) dairy cows in 15 herds in Colorado.

Procedure—Serum samples were tested with a commercial ELISA. A herd was considered to be infected with MAP if results of mycobacterial culture of ≥ 1 individual cow fecal sample were positive or if ≥ 1 culled cow had histologic evidence of MAP infection.

Results—424 of the 10,280 (4.12%) cows were seropositive. Within-herd prevalence of seropositive cows ranged from 0% to 7.82% (mean, 2.6%). Infection was confirmed in 11 dairies. Cows in herds that had imported ≥ 8% of their current herd size annually during the preceding 5 years were 3.28 times as likely to be seropositive as were cows in herds that imported < 8%. Cows in herds with ≥ 600 lactating cows were 3.12 times as likely to be seropositive as were cows in herds with < 600 lactating cows. Cows in herds with a history of clinical signs of MAP infection were 2.27 times as likely to be seropositive as were cows in herds without clinical signs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Annual importation rate, herd size, and whether cows in the herd had clinical signs typical of MAP infection were associated with the risk that individual cows would be seropositive for MAP infection. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:97–101)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the effects of transdermal flunixin administration on serum prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cortisol concentrations in piglets undergoing castration.

ANIMALS

104 litters with at least 4 male piglets/litter.

PROCEDURES

Litters were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments: transdermal flunixin (3.33 mg/kg) administration followed by surgical castration (CF; n = 28), transdermal flunixin administration followed by sham castration (SF; n = 26), application of physiologic saline solution followed by sham castration (S; n = 26), and application of physiologic saline solution followed by surgical castration (C; n = 24). Blood samples were collected 24 hours before and 1, 4, and 25 hours after castration or sham castration.

RESULTS

Serum PGE2 concentrations for piglets in the C and CF groups did not differ at any time. Piglets in the S group tended to have higher serum PGE2 concentrations 1 hour after sham castration compared with piglets in the SF group. One hour after the procedure, piglets that underwent castration had higher serum cortisol concentrations than did piglets that underwent sham castration. Piglets in the CF group had higher serum cortisol concentrations than did piglets in the SF group 4 hours after the procedure, but serum cortisol concentrations did not differ between the C and S groups.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Further studies are needed to explore dosing regimens, including effective doses and administration frequencies, and the pharmacokinetics of flunixin following transdermal administration in piglets undergoing castration.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research