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Summary

A search of medical records at the Georgia Animal Poison Information Center over a 19-month period revealed 240 cases of dog and cat exposure to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsaid). The most common nsaid consumed were ibuprofen, acetaminophen, aspirin, and indomethacin. The most common clinical signs of toxicosis were vomiting and diarrhea, cns depression, and circulatory manifestations. Pets are at risk from nsaid toxicosis through administration by the owners or accidental consumption of improperly stored drugs.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Cardiorespiratory effects of abdominal insufflation were evaluated in 8 dogs during isoflurane anesthesia. Each dog was studied 3 times, in 1 of the following orders of insufflation pressures: 10-20-30, 20-30-10, 30-20-10, 10-30-20, 20-10-30, and 30-10-20 mm of Hg. Anesthesia was induced by use of a mask, dogs were intubated, and anesthesia was maintained by isoflurane in 100% oxygen. After instrumentation, baseline values were recorded (time 0), and the abdomen was insufflated with nitrous oxide. Data were recorded at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes after insufflation. The abdomen was then desufflated, with recording of data continuing at 35 and 40 minutes. Mean arterial pressure increased at 5 minutes during 20 mm of Hg insufflation pressure, and from 20 to 30 minutes during 30 mm of Hg pressure. Tidal volume decreased from 5 to 30 minutes during 10 and 20 mm of Hg pressures, and from 5 to 40 minutes during 30 mm of Hg pressure. Minute ventilation decreased at 10 and 20 minutes during 20 mm of Hg pressure. End-tidal CO2 concentration increased from 5 to 30 minutes during 20 and 30 mm of Hg pressure. The PaCO2 decreased at 40 minutes during 10 mm of Hg pressure, at 30 minutes during 20 mm of Hg pressure, and from 10 to 40 minutes during 30 mm of Hg pressure. Values for pH decreased from 10 to 30 minutes during 20 and 30 mm of Hg pressures. The PaO2 decreased from 20 to 40 minutes during 10 mm of Hg pressure, at 30 minutes during 20 mm of Hg pressure, and from 10 to 40 minutes during 30 mm of Hg pressure. Percentage decrease in tidal volume was greater at 5 and 15 minutes with 30 mm of Hg pressure. Differences in percentage increase in end tidal CO2 concentration were observed among the 3 pressures from 5 to 30 minutes. Although significant, these changes do not preclude use of laparoscopy if insufflation pressure > 20 mm of Hg is avoided.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Detection of autoantibody, complement, or both bound to rbc is an essential requirement for unequivocal diagnosis of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in dogs. An enzyme-linked antiglobulin test was adapted for laboratory diagnosis of this disease. The refinement and routine use of this assay have allowed further observation of the pathogenesis of the disease process. In particular, degree of hemolysis can be related to the degree of rbc sensitization associated with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia, and this correlation is highest for IgG autoantibody. Results indicate that autoantibody isotype might have an important role in the hemolytic process.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

The abomasa of 1,949 slaughtered feedlot cattle, 45 necropsied feedlot cattle that died 2 to 45 days after arrival, and 45 necropsied pastured cattle were opened and examined. Of these organs, 484,1, and none, respectively, contained erosions. The slaughtered cattle were fattened at 3 locations: 1,305 with 430 eroded abomasa were fed a ration of corn in northeastern Colorado; 144 cattle with 4 affected abomasa fed a ration of milo in south-central Arizona; and 500 cattle with 50 affected abomasa fed a ration of milo and corn in northwestern Texas. The red-brown lesions developed late during the second semester of fattening and were located mostly on fundic folds. Those on fold edges were linear and were 2 to 15 cm long, whereas those on fold sides were punctate and were 2 to 15 mm in diameter. Normal fold edges contained fewer goblet cells and less surface mucus than did fold sides. Eroded folds had disruption of surface epithelium, damage to endothelial cells, and dilated, thrombosed, congested, and ruptured capillaries. Mean pH values of 16 normal and 17 eroded abomasa were 4.7 and 3.9, respectively. Necrosis of all tissue toward the mucosal surface of erosions was extensive. The cause of gastric erosion in cattle is not known.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To understand large animal veterinarians’ knowledge of select zoonotic diseases that cause livestock abortions and identify barriers to using personal protective equipment (PPE).

SAMPLE

A convenience sample of 469 veterinarians currently working with livestock.

PROCEDURES

We sent an electronic survey invitation to large animal veterinarians through various veterinary organizations. Respondents answered questions addressing knowledge and prior experience with select abortion-associated zoonotic diseases, resources available for infection control, attitudes and barriers to PPE use, and demographics.

RESULTS

Median participant age was 49 years (range, 22 to 82 years), and 54% (235/438) were male. Half of veterinarians (185/348) were contacted 5 or fewer times per year to consult on livestock abortions. No veterinarians surveyed answered all questions on zoonotic disease transmission correctly. Personal protective equipment access varied, from 99% (289/290) having access to gloves to 20% (59/290) having access to respirators. Concerns for spreading disease to other animals (136/289 [47%]) and to other humans (108/287 [38%]) ranked as the most common reported motivators for PPE use. Reported barriers to PPE use among survey participants were the inconvenience of taking PPE into the field (101/286 [35%]) and the inconvenience of wearing PPE (97/286 [34%]). Access to PPE was not correlated with PPE use.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Surveyed veterinarians had limited knowledge of transmission of select abortion-associated zoonotic diseases. Incomplete understanding might lead to inappropriate PPE selection, preventable disease exposure, or missed opportunities for client education. Inconvenience was a primary reason PPE was not used.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association