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Objective

To determine whether booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid would affect the sudden death syndrome (SDS) mortality rate among feedlot cattle.

Design

Field trial.

Animals

83,115 cattle at a Nebraska feedlot.

Procedure

Cattle arriving at the feedlot underwent routine processing according to established protocol. All cattle received a sequentially numbered ear tag and a 2-ml dose of a multivalent bacterin-toxoid designed to protect cattle against Clostridium chauvoei, C septicum, C novyi, C sordellii, and C perfringens types C and D. Approximately 90 days prior to slaughter, growth promotants were implanted in all cattle, and cattle were allocated to a treatment or control group on the basis of the last digits of their ear tag numbers. Cattle in the treatment group received a second 2-ml dose of clostridial bacterin-toxoid; control cattle did not.

Results

Significant differences between groups in regard to crude, feeding pen, or SDS mortality rates were not detected. Sudden death syndrome mortality rate across both groups was 0.24%. If the SDS mortality rate in midwestern feedlot cattle was reduced ≥ 40% by booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid, this experiment included enough animals to have a 90% probability of detecting that difference.

Clinical Implications

Booster vaccination with a multivalent clostridial bacterin-toxoid does not affect SDS mortality rate among feedlot cattle. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997,211:749–753)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate associations between neonatal serum IgG1 concentration and pre- and postweaning morbidity and mortality rates and average daily gains (ADGs) in beef calves and define a cutoff point for serum IgG1 concentration necessary for optimal health and performance of beef calves.

Design—Nonconcurrent cohort study.

Animals—1,568 crossbred beef calves.

Procedure—Single radial immunodiffusion was used to quantitate IgG1 concentration in sera collected from calves between 24 and 72 hours after birth. Logistic regression, ANCOVA, and likelihood ratios were used to analyze data.

Results—In the preweaning period, lower perinatal IgG1 concentrations were significantly associated with higher morbidity rates, higher mortality rates, and lower ADGs. Calves with serum IgG1 concentration < 2,400 mg/dL were 1.6 times as likely to become ill before weaning and 2.7 times as likely to die before weaning as calves with higher serum IgG1 concentrations. Calves with serum IgG1 concentration of at least 2,700 mg/dL weighed an estimated 3.35 kg (7.38 lb) more at 205 days of age than calves with lower serum IgG1 concentration. No significant association of serum IgG1 concentration with feedlot morbidity, death, or ADG was identified.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—By use of likelihood ratios, the threshold of serum IgG1 concentration for optimal health and performance of calves was higher than values reported previously. Implementation and maintenance of management and intervention strategies designed for early detection and treatment of calves at risk for failure of passive transfer will likely result in increases in preweaning health and performance parameters.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association