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  • Author or Editor: Cynthia M. Pérez x
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Summary

An epidemiologic study was conducted by use of the Veterinary Medical Data Base to investigate risk factors for blastomycosis in dogs. From January 1980 through June 1990, 971 cases of blastomycosis in dogs from 22 North American veterinary teaching hospitals were identified. Of these cases, 114 (11.7%) were excluded from the study because of incomplete information regarding age, body weight, sex, and neuter status. A control group of 417,079 dogs was selected that included all other dogs with medical conditions unrelated to blastomycosis for which records were submitted to the data base during the same period.

The prevalence of blastomycosis in dogs was 205/100,000 admissions during the study period. When veterinary teaching hospitals were grouped on the basis of their general geographic location, dogs in the East South central, East North central, West South central, and South Atlantic regions had a significantly (P < 0.05) increased risk of acquiring blastomycosis, compared with that of dogs in the Mountain/Pacific region. When teaching hospitals from all geographic regions were considered, dogs had a significantly (P < 0.05) increased risk of acquiring blastomycosis in autumn, compared with that in spring.

Sporting dogs and hounds, as defined by the American Kennel Club, were at increased risk for blastomycosis. At highest risk were Bluetick Coonhounds, Treeing-walker Coonhounds, Pointers, and Weimaraners, compared with mixed-breed dogs.

Ages of dogs with blastomycosis tended to be normally distributed. Generally, the highest-risk group was composed of sexually intact male dogs, 2 to 4 years old, weighing 22.7 to 34.1 kg. This same pattern was observed for sporting dogs and hounds.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

The Veterinary Medical Data Base was used to conduct an epidemiologic study of gastric dilatation and dilatation-volvulus (gdv) to describe changes over time in frequency of canine hospital admissions, to identify risk factors, and to estimate their relative importance. Cases in this case-control study included 1,934 dogs with gdv that were admitted to 12 participating veterinary hospitals from 1980 to 1989. The controls were 3,868 dogs with other diagnoses that were randomly selected from the same hospitals. Frequency of gdv per 1,000 canine hospital admissions ranged from 2.9 to 6.8. The case fatality rate was 28.6 and 33.3% for gastric dilatation alone and for gastric dilatation with volvulus, respectively. Using logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio (or) and its 95% confidence limits (95% cl) for gdv associated with purebred vs mixed-breed dogs were 2.5 and 2.1, 3.0, respectively. The risk of gdv was associated with increasing age (Χ2 = 305.6, P < 0.0001) and increasing weight (Χ2 = 627.8, P < 0.0001). Significant association of gdv risk with sex or neuter status was not found. The 5 breeds having at least 10 cases and 8 controls and with the highest risk of gdv were Great Dane (or, 10.0; 95% cl, 6.4, 15.6), Weimaraner (or, 4.6; 95% cl, 2.3, 9.2), Saint Bernard (or, 4.2; 95% cl, 2.3, 7.4), Gordon Setter (or, 4.1; 95% cl, 1.8, 9.3), and Irish Setter (or, 3.5; 95% cl, 2.4, 5.0). The effect of increasing body weight on gdv risk was less than that of increasing ideal adult breed weight, determined by published breed standards. There was considerable heterogeneity of gdv risk for individual breeds within ideal adult breed-weight groups. The overall pattern of risk was suggestive that, in addition to age, body weight, and neuter status, a dog's body (thoracic) conformation also was an important determinant of susceptibility to gdv.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association