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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To develop a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique to identify Toxoplasma gondii DNA in biological samples from cats and dogs.

Design

To artificially create samples that would mimic those acquired in a clinical setting from animals with naturally acquired toxoplasmosis. Using these samples, a PCR test to identify T gondii DNA was developed.

Sample Population

Feline and canine aqueous humor, CSF, serum, and blood samples.

Procedure

Tachyzoites of several strains of T gondii grown in cell culture were added to feline and canine aqueous humor, CSF, serum, and blood samples. Protocols for identifying T gondii DNA by use of the PCR were developed.

Results

The DNA from as few as 10 tachyzoites of T gondii could be identified in feline and canine aqueous humor, CSF, and serum samples. One hundred tachyzoites could be identified in blood samples.

Conclusions

Toxoplasma gondii can be identified in feline and canine biological samples by use of the PCR.

Clinical Relevance

Correlation of clinical disease to T gondii serum antibodies provides only a presumptive diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. Use of PCR to detect T gondii DNA in biological samples from cats and dogs may provide a sensitive tool for the antemortem diagnosis of toxoplasmosis and may be most beneficial when used in conjunction with serum antibody titers.(Am J Vet Res 1996;57:264-267)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

During the first part of a study, cats were inoculated with Cryptococcus neoformans via the following routes: intradermal, intranasal, iv, and intracisternal. Only use of the iv route of inoculation consistently induced disseminated cryptococcosis. In the second part of the study, disseminated cryptococcosis was experimentally induced in cats via iv inoculation of C neoformans. One month after inoculation, 3 cats were treated with ketoconazole (10 mg/kg of body weight/d) and 3 cats were treated with itraconazole (10 mg/kg/d) for 3 months. One of the ketoconzole-treated and 2 of the itraconazole-treated cats also had cryptococcosis of the cns when treatment was begun. During treatment, serum cryptococcal antigen titer progressively decreased in all cats. Abnormalities in cbc values or the serum biochemical profile were not found in any cat during treatment. However, all ketoconazole-treated cats became anorectic and lost weight. Side effects were not seen in itraconazole-treated cats. During the 3-month posttreatment observation period, all cats remained healthy. At necropsy, histologic evidence of cryptococcosis was not found in the 3 ketoconazole-treated cats or in 2 of the itraconazole-treated cats. In the third itraconazole-treated cat, cryptococcal organisms were found in the kidneys.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association