Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Craig A. Clifford x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To determine features of lymphoma of the tarsus in cats.

Design—Multi-institutional retrospective study.

Animals—23 cats with cutaneous lymphoma of the tarsus.

Procedures—Veterinary oncologists were requested to submit cases fitting the following criteria: histologically or cytologically confirmed lymphoma with a location at or near the tarsus and described as subcutaneous or mass-like. Data regarding breed, sex, age, FeLV and FIV status, and reason for evaluation were collected. Results of staging tests, location of the tumor, immunophenotype, and histopathologic description were recorded. Type of treatments, outcome, survival time, presence or absence of progressive disease, and cause of death or reason for euthanasia were also recorded.

Results—Most cats were older, with a median age of 12 years (range, 7 to 18 years). No association with positive retroviral status was found. Popliteal lymph node involvement at diagnosis was reported in 5 cats, and a suspicion of lymphoma at a different site on the basis of results of abdominal ultrasonography was reported in 4 cats. Treatments were variable and included corticosteroids alone (n = 2), chemotherapy (9), radiation and chemotherapy (7), or surgery with or without chemotherapy (5). Thirteen cats were reported to have lymphoma at a different site at the time of last follow-up, death, or euthanasia. Median survival time for all cats in the study was 190 days (range, 17 to 1,011 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that tarsal lymphoma is an uncommon manifestation of lymphoma in cats, and in this study was most commonly nonepitheliotropic and of high grade as determined on histologic evaluation. Systemic involvement was identified; therefore, thorough staging is recommended prior to initiating treatment. Future studies are warranted to evaluate effective treatment protocols.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate outcome associated with subcutaneous and intramuscular hemangiosarcomas treated with adjuvant doxorubicin in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—21 dogs.

Procedures—Records of dogs with histologically confirmed hemangiosarcoma, no detectable metastasis at initial evaluation, and adequate local tumor control were included. Age, sex, number of treatments, treatment interval, radiation therapy, and concurrent use of cyclophosphamide or deracoxib were evaluated for associations with disease-free interval (DFI) or survival time. Three to 6 cycles of doxorubicin were planned. Disease-free interval was defined as time of definitive surgery to time of local recurrence, metastasis, or both. Survival time was defined as the beginning of the DFI to time of death.

Results—17 tumors were subcutaneous, and 4 were intramuscular. Median age was 9 years. Median weight was 31.1 kg (68.4 lb). Five dogs received adjuvant radiation therapy. Median DFI for subcutaneous tumors was 1,553 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 469 days to not estimable). Median DFI for intramuscular tumors was 265.5 days (95% CI, 123 to 301 days). Median survival time for subcutaneous tumors was 1,189 days (95% CI, 596 days to not estimable). Median survival time for intramuscular tumors was 272.5 days (95% CI, 123 to 355 days). For dogs with subcutaneous tumors, younger age (< 9 years) was associated with longer DFI and survival time. Dogs with subcutaneous tumors that did not receive radiation therapy had longer DFI.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs with subcutaneous hemangiosarcoma had a more favorable outcome, compared with dogs with intramuscular hemangiosarcoma, when treated with adequate local control and adjuvant doxorubicin.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To examine the biological behavior of ulnar osteosarcoma and evaluate predictors of survival time in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—30 dogs with primary ulnar osteosarcoma.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed. Variables recorded and examined to identify predictors of survival time were signalment, tumor location in the ulna, tumor length, serum alkaline phosphatase activity, surgery type, completeness of excision, tumor stage, tumor grade, histologic subtype, development of metastases, and use of chemotherapy.

Results—30 cases were identified from 9 institutions. Eleven dogs were treated with partial ulnar ostectomy and 14 with amputation; in 5 dogs, a resection was not performed. Twenty-two dogs received chemotherapy. Median disease-free interval and survival time were 437 and 463 days, respectively. Negative prognostic factors for survival time determined via univariate analyses were histologic subtype and development of lung metastases. Telangiectatic or telangiectatic-mixed subtype (n = 5) was the only negative prognostic factor identified via multivariate analysis (median survival time, 208 days). Dogs with telangiectatic subtype were 6.99 times as likely to die of the disease.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The prognosis for ulnar osteosarcoma in this population was no worse and may have been better than the prognosis for dogs with osteosarcoma involving other appendicular sites. Partial ulnar ostectomy was associated with a low complication rate and good to excellent function and did not compromise survival time. Telangiectatic or telangiectatic-mixed histologic subtype was a negative prognostic factor for survival time. The efficacy of chemotherapy requires further evaluation.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of dogs with presumed primary hepatic lymphoma treated with various multiagent, doxorubicin-based chemotherapeutic protocols and identify factors associated with prognosis.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—18 dogs with presumed primary hepatic lymphoma.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for information on signalment, treatment, and outcome.

Results—8 dogs had a complete remission (CR), with a median remission duration of 120 days. Dogs with leukocytosis, neutrophilia, hypoalbuminemia, hyperbilirubinemia, or a combination of hypoalbuminemia and hyperbilirubinemia were less likely to achieve a CR. Overall median survival time (MST) was 63 days (range, 2 to 402 days). In a multivariate analysis, response to treatment and serum albumin concentration were associated with MST. Dogs that did not achieve a CR had a significantly shorter MST than did dogs that did achieve a CR (13 vs 283 days, respectively). Dogs with serum albumin concentration < 2.5 g/dL at the time treatment was initiated had a significantly shorter MST than did dogs with serum albumin concentration within reference limits (10 vs 128 days, respectively). There was also a positive correlation between serum albumin concentration and survival time (r = 0.74).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that dogs with primary hepatic lymphoma that underwent chemotherapy had a poor prognosis, with a low response rate. Dogs that responded to treatment had a better prognosis, and dogs with hypoalbuminemia had a poorer prognosis.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association