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  • Author or Editor: Corey R. Wall x
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A 9-day-old pony colt was referred for evaluation of tachycardia and tachypnea observed since birth. Gestation and parturition had been normal. Since birth, milk had been observed coming from both nostrils when the foal was in lateral recumbency. During the first week after birth, a mild upper respiratory tract noise developed that was persistent.

On evaluation, the foal was bright and alert and in fair body condition. Physical examination revealed a rectal temperature of 38.4°C (101.2°F), a heart rate of 110 beats/min, and a respiratory rate of 80 beats/min. No murmurs or arrhythmias were detected on thoracic auscultation, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 2-day-old 44-kg (97-lb) purebred female Holstein calf was evaluated for weakness, signs of depression, and inability to stand unsupported. Immediately after birth, the calf could stand and was tube fed with approximately 4 L of colostrum. Twenty-four hours after birth, the calf was standing and suckled its daily requirement of milk replacer, but 48 hours after birth, the calf was recumbent and only drank half of its 2-L morning milk replacer feeding. The owner had treated the calf with 100 mg of tulathromycin that morning. On initial examination, rectal temperature (39°C [101.5°F]) and heart rate (120 beats/min) were

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
History

A 2-year-old Boer goat buck was evaluated at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Oklahoma State University because of straining to urinate for 24 hours. The goat had been treated twice in the past 4 months by another veterinarian for urolithiasis. Three months previously, the owner had noticed a swelling in the perineal region.

At the time of hospital admission, the goat postured to urinate and vocalized while straining but was unable to void urine. A distended urinary bladder was identified on deep abdominal palpation. Palpation of the perineal region revealed a large, turgid, fluid-filled structure approximately 4 cm wide

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association