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  • Author or Editor: Colin B. Carrig x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Cutaneous arterial blood supply to the tail was evaluated in 12 dogs. Subtraction radiography of internal iliac artery and distal aorta angiography in 3 of these dogs was used to determine arterial blood supply to the tail from the median sacral and lateral caudal arteries. Dissection of the tail in 8 canine cadavers revealed bilateral subcutaneous location of lateral caudal arteries following tail amputation. An axial pattern flap based on the lateral caudal arteries contributed to the reconstruction of a large caudodorsal cutaneous defect in a dog. An axial pattern flap based on the lateral caudal arteries following tail amputation may be indicated to aid reconstruction of large caudodorsal cutaneous defects of the trunk in dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

A radiographic image-classification system was developed to analyze and compare the shape of the humerus of neonatal Labrador Retriever and Labrador Retriever × Beagle pups that were either phenotypically normal or affected with an ocular-skeletal dysplasia syndrome. The system consistently defined the shape of the humerus within the groups of pups studied and indicated a difference in the shape of the humerus between normal and affected pups. Results indicated that the radiographic image-classification system may be able to identify Labrador Retriever pups affected by the ocular-skeletal dysplasia syndrome at or shortly after birth.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

In rats infected with the cestode Taenia taeniaeformis, hepatomegaly results from development of parasitic cysts in the liver. Diffuse nodular mucosal hyperplasia in the glandular region (corpus and antrum) of the stomach, and gross thickening of the intestinal mucosa also result. Between postinfection days (PID) 21 and 84, radiologic observations were made after oral administration of a barium sulfate suspension in T taeniaeformis-infected rats and in age/sex-matched controls. There was radiographic evidence of hepatic enlargement at PID 21. Enlargement of the gastric folds was first observed along the greater curvature of the stomach at PID 35. Fimbriation of small intestinal mucosal surfaces resulted from thickening of the intestinal villi and was observed in the duodenum at PID 21. Intestinal motility was assessed, and contractions were counted, using image intensification fluoroscopy, then were recorded on videotape. There were no significant differences between control and infected rats for gastric emptying time, intestinal transit time, and number of intestinal contractions per minute. Barium contrast radiography clearly indicated large gastric folds, thickening of the small intestinal villi, and hepatic enlargement, and was useful for assessing gastrointestinal motility.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

The biocompatibility and osteoconductive properties of biocompatible osteoconductive polymer (bop), a synthetic implant, were evaluated. Bilateral oval cortical defects (1 × 2 cm) were made in the lateral subtrochanteric area of the proximal portion of the femur in 16 dogs that later were treated with bop fiber (n = 16) or autogenous cancellous bone (n = 11), or were not treated (n = 5). The bop block was attached extraperiosteally to the proximal portion of the humerus in 6 dogs. Radiographic assessment of surgery sites was performed at 4-week intervals, and histologic evaluation was performed at 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks after surgery. Radiographic signs of bone healing were not observed in defects treated with bop fiber. Defects treated with cancellous bone or not treated had radiographic signs of progressive bone ingrowth. Radiographic evidence of periosteal new bone formation near control and bop-treated defects was observed 4 weeks after surgery; increased periosteal reaction was associated with bop fiber. This new bone had resorbed by week 24, except bone adjacent to bop fiber, where continued periosteal reaction was apparent. Histologic evidence of bone formation was observed extending to, but not incorporating, bop fibers. The bop fibers became surrounded by a fibrous capsule, and fibrovascular connective tissue infiltrated between and into bop fibers, but minimal bone formation incorporated the bop material during the follow-up period. During that time, active periosteal new bone formation was evident adjacent to the bop fibers. Defects treated with cancellous bone or not treated healed by ingrowth of cancellous bone during the first 12 weeks after surgery and by reformation of the lateral cortical wall by week 24. The bop blocks became surrounded by a fibrous capsule, but connective tissue or bone ingrowth into bop blocks was not observed. Results indicate that bop is not osteoconductive within a 6-month time frame when used in subtrochanteric femoral defects or when placed extraperiosteally on the proximal portion of the humerus of clinically normal dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a method for experimental induction of osteoarthritis in the hip joints of dogs.

Animals—12 mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure—A unilateral triple pelvic osteotomy was performed. In 6 dogs, the iliac osteotomy was repaired with 45° of internal rotation, reducing coverage of the femoral head by the acetabulum. In the other 6 dogs, the fragments were repaired in anatomic alignment. Radiography, force plate evaluations, and subjective lameness evaluations were performed before and after surgery. Dogs were euthanatized 7 months after surgery, and samples of cartilage and joint capsule were examined histologically.

Results—Subjective lameness scores, radiographic appearance of the hip joints, and Norberg angles were not significantly different between groups; however, force plate evaluations did reveal significant differences in vertical ground reaction forces. Femoral head coverage was significantly decreased with rotation of the acetabulum. Mild inflammatory changes were discernible in the joint capsule and articular cartilage of some dogs in both groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that 45° internal rotation of the acetabulum does not consistently induce biologically important osteoarthritic changes in the hip joints of dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:484–491)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association