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  • Author or Editor: Colby G. Burns x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical findings and outcomes for cats and dogs with peritoneopericardial diaphragmatic hernia (PPDH) treated surgically or nonsurgically.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—28 dogs and 30 cats.

Procedures—Medical records for cats and dogs evaluated at 1 of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals were reviewed, and data regarding clinical signs, diagnostic and surgical findings, and outcome were evaluated.

Results—Prevalence of PPDH in the 2 hospitals during the study period was 0.025% (0.062% and 0.015% for cats and dogs, respectively); PPDH was an incidental finding for 13 (46.4%) dogs and 15 (50.0%) cats. Other congenital abnormalities were identified in 16 (571%) dogs and 7 (23.3%) cats (most commonly umbilical hernias, abdominal wall hernias cranial to the umbilicus, or sternal anomalies). Thirty-four (58.6%) animals underwent surgical repair of PPDH; 27 (79.4%) of these animals had a primary diagnosis of PPDH. Detection of clinical signs of PPDH (primary diagnosis) and intestines in the pericardial sac were significantly associated with surgical treatment. Short-term mortality rate for surgically treated animals was 8.8% (3/34). Clinical signs associated with PPDH resolved in 29 (85.3%) of surgically treated animals. No significant differences were detected between dogs and cats or between surgically and nonsurgically treated animals regarding long-term survival rate.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study indicated animals with clinical signs of PPDH were more likely to undergo surgery than were animals without such signs. Herniorrhaphy was typically effective for resolution of clinical signs. Long-term survival rates were similar regardless of treatment method. Surgical or nonsurgical treatment of PPDH may be appropriate for animals with or without clinical signs, respectively.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate manufacturing variability, diffusion of filling solutions, and maintenance of occlusion over time in 3 sizes of silicone hydraulic occluders (HOs).

Sample Population—2-, 5-, and 20-mm HOs (HO2, HO5, and HO20, respectively).

Procedures—Manufacturing variability was analyzed by comparing variation in internal luminal areas and filling volumes within each size group. Occluders were filled to 100% occlusion with air (n = 4), saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (4), or sodium hyaluronate (4) and submerged in simulated body fluid. Changes in luminal area and weight were recorded for 133 days to evaluate maintenance of occlusion.

Results—Considerable variability in uninflated luminal area and fill volumes was observed among the 3 sizes of HOs. Loss of occlusion developed in the first 12 hours in all air-filled HOs. Fluid-filled occluders were reliable in maintenance of occlusion after 133 days (99.99% for HO20, 99.59% for HO5, and 90.40% for HO2), although diffusion of saline solution and hyaluronate from all HOs was confirmed by detection of significant decreases in weight over time. There was no significant difference in weight loss between HOs filled with saline solution and HOs filled with sodium hyaluronate.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Saline solution or sodium hyaluronate may be used as a filling solution in the HOs tested. Maintenance of occlusion was best in the larger sizes. Saline solution or sodium hyaluronate should be used in future clinical investigations of HOs. Retrograde filling to remove air should be used when filling HOs with fluid.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research