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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether hepatic portal vascularity assessed via intraoperative mesenteric portovenography (IMP) is related to outcome in cats undergoing surgical attenuation of a congenital portosystemic shunt (CPSS).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—25 cats, each with 1 CPSS, in which IMP was performed before and after temporary complete occlusion of the shunting vessel to provide complete (n = 9) or partial (16) shunt attenuation.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for signalment, clinical history, postoperative complications, clinical outcome, and results of bile acids stimulation testing. Portovenograms obtained before and after shunt occlusion were graded to determine whether degree of intrahepatic portal branching was correlated with degree of shunt attenuation, clinical or biochemical factors, postoperative complications, or outcome. In 12 of the 16 cats that had partial CPSS attenuation, procedures were later repeated to achieve complete (n = 9) and additional partial (1) CPSS attenuation.

Results—Degree of opacification of the intrahepatic portal vessels increased significantly (higher portovenogram grade) after CPSS attenuation. The median portovenogram grade assigned after temporary shunt occlusion at the first surgery was significantly higher in cats that did not have postattenuation neurologic complications or neurologic signs at follow-up than in cats that did. It was also higher in cats that had a better clinical response to surgery versus those that had a poor response and in cats with reduced preprandial and postprandial serum bile acids concentrations at follow-up versus those that did not.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—IMP may be used to help predict complications and outcome following surgical treatment of CPSS in cats.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine results of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in dogs with vestibular disorders (VD) and correlate results of MR imaging with clinical findings.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—85 dogs.

Procedure—Information on signalment, clinical signs, and presumptive lesion location was obtained from the medical records, and MR images were reviewed.

Results—27 dogs had peripheral VD, 37 had central VD, and 21 had paradoxical VD. Of the 27 dogs with peripheral VD, 11 (41%) had MR imaging abnormalities involving the ipsilateral tympanic bulla compatible with otitis media (6 also had abnormalities involving the petrous portion of the ipsilateral temporal bone compatible with otitis interna), 7 (26%) had MR imaging abnormalities compatible with middle ear neoplasia, 2 (7%) had an ipsilateral cerebellopontine angle lesion, and 7 (26%) did not have MR imaging abnormalities. All dogs with central and paradoxical VD had abnormalities evident on MR images. Of the 37 dogs with central VD, 13 (35%) had an extra-axial lesion, 6 (16%) had an intra-axial lesion, and 18 (49%) had multiple intra-axial lesions. In 23 (62%) dogs with central VD, lesions on MR images corresponded with location suspected on the basis of clinical signs. Of the 21 dogs with paradoxical VD, 12 (57%) had an extra-axial lesion, 5 (24%) had an intra-axial lesion, and 4 (19%) had multiple intra-axial lesions. Location of lesions on MR images agreed with location suspected on the basis of clinical signs in 19 (90%) dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that MR imaging may be helpful in the diagnosis and treatment of VD in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:385–391)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether hepatic portal vascularity, as assessed by intraoperative mesenteric portovenography (IMP), is related to outcome in dogs undergoing attenuation of single congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSSs).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—45 dogs, each with a single CPSS, in which IMP was performed before and after temporary complete occlusion of the shunting vessel and that underwent complete (17 dogs) or partial (28 dogs) CPSS attenuation (surgery 1).

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed for signalment, clinical history, and bile acids stimulation test results. Intrahepatic portal vessel (IPV) opacification in pre- and postocclusion portovenograms was graded to determine whether the degree of opacification was correlated with the degree of shunt attenuation, clinical or biochemical factors, or long-term clinical outcome. In 17 of 28 dogs that had partial CPSS attenuation, these procedures were subsequently repeated (surgery 2) to achieve complete (14 dogs) or further partial (3 dogs) CPSS attenuation.

Results—Compared with preattenuation findings, IPV opacification increased significantly after partial or complete CPSS attenuation. The degree of IPV opacification before and after CPSS occlusion (surgery 1) was greater in dogs that tolerated complete versus partial CPSS attenuation and was correlated positively with age. The degree of IPV opacification following CPSS occlusion (surgery 1) was maximal in all dogs without encephalopathy and was correlated negatively with follow-up preprandial serum bile acids concentrations and positively with clinical improvement.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Data suggest that IMP can be used to assess changes in IPV blood flow and help predict outcome following attenuation of single CPSSs in dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association