Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Christopher G. Pirie x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Case Description—A 2-year-old Morgan mare was evaluated because of a corneal ulceration.

Clinical Findings—An irregular, deep stromal corneal ulcer in an area of malacia was noted in the left eye. Hypopyon was present in the ventral portion of the anterior chamber with moderate aqueous flare. The nictitating membrane of the left eye had hairs originating from its leading edge that contacted the corneal surface.

Treatment and Outcome—General anesthesia was induced, and a bulbar pedicle conjunctival graft was performed. The conjunctiva at the leading edge of the nictitating membrane, including the aberrant hair follicles, was excised. Microscopically, a nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium, sebaceous glands, and hair shafts were present, confirming a choristoma of pilosebaceous origin at the leading edge of the nictitating membrane. Six weeks after surgery, the horse had no signs of discomfort, with no regrowth of the hairs; no loss of vision was evident.

Clinical Relevance—Ocular choristomas develop secondary to defective fetal cellular differentiation and are rarely reported in the equine literature. The choristoma in this horse contained ectopic hair follicles with hair growth as well as sebaceous glands. This finding emphasizes the importance of a thorough adnexal examination in horses with corneal disease.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify and characterize abnormalities of iris vasculature in dogs with diabetes mellitus, compared to clinically normal, age-matched control dogs, by means of anterior segment angiography.

ANIMALS

10 dogs with naturally occurring diabetes mellitus and 10 age-matched control dogs with no ocular or systemic disease.

PROCEDURES

The day before iris vasculature abnormality (IVA) assessment, all dogs underwent complete physical and ophthalmic examinations and baseline clinicopathologic analyses. For diabetic dogs, serum fructosamine concentration and a 12-hour blood glucose concentration curve were generated. The next day, all dogs were sedated and anterior segment angiography (following IV injection of indocyanine green [1 mg/kg] and subsequently sodium fluorescein [20 mg/kg]) was performed with a full-spectrum camera and camera adapter system. Group findings were compared, and multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify potential factor associations with IVAs.

RESULTS

During anterior segment angiography, the arterial, capillary, and venous phases were identified in all dogs. Times to onset of all phases in diabetic dogs were significantly less than those in control dogs. Vascular disruptions within the peripupillary region (evident following sodium fluorescein administration) were common in diabetic dogs. Severity of dye leakage into the iris stroma and aqueous humor was significantly greater in diabetic dogs than in control dogs. Duration of disease, mean blood glucose concentration, and serum fructosamine concentration were significantly associated with IVAs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

In diabetic dogs, anterior segment angiography revealed IVAs that were not evident in control dogs. The severity of those changes appeared to be associated with disease duration and blood glucose regulation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effectiveness of a novel fluorescence tracer agent, MB-102, for conducting ocular angiography in dogs.

ANIMALS

10 ophthalmologically normal dogs (2 to 4 years old) and 10 dogs with retinal degeneration or primary open-angle glaucoma (< 6 years old).

PROCEDURES

While anesthetized, all dogs received sodium fluorescein (20 mg/kg, IV) or MB-102 (20 or 40 mg/kg, IV) first and then the other dye in a second treatment session 2 days later in a randomized crossover design. Anterior fluorescence angiography was performed on one eye and posterior fluorescence angiography on the other. Imaging was performed with a full-spectrum camera and camera adaptor system. Filter sets that were tailored to match the excitation and emission characteristics of each angiographic fluorescent agent were used.

RESULTS

All phases and phase intervals during anterior and posterior segment angiography were identified, regardless of the dye used. However, agent fluorescence and visualization of the iridal blood vessels were hindered in some dogs, irrespective of agent, owing to the degree of iridal pigmentation present. No significant difference was noted between the 2 dyes in any phase or phase interval, and slight improvement in image contrast was observed with MB-102 during the venous phases owing to a reduction of vessel wall staining in both normal and diseased eyes.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that MB-102 would be useful for conducting ocular angiography in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate whether differences existed between clinically normal dogs and dogs with goniodysgenesis-related glaucoma (GDRG) in serum autoantibodies against optic nerve antigens.

Animals—16 dogs with GDRG, 17 healthy dogs with unremarkable pectinate ligament and iridocorneal angle morphology, and 13 euthanized dogs with no major ocular abnormalities or underlying diseases.

Procedures—Western blotting was performed with optic nerve extracts from the euthanized dogs as an antigen source and serum from clinically normal dogs and dogs with GDRG as a primary antibody (autoantibody) source. Blots were evaluated for presence and density of bands.

Results—Multiple bands were identified on western blots from all dogs with GDRG and all clinically normal dogs, with a high degree of variability among individual dogs. Dogs with GDRG were significantly more likely than healthy dogs to have bands present at 38, 40, and 68 kDa. Dogs with GDRG had significant increases in autoreactivity at 40 and 53 kDa and a significant decrease in autoreactivity at 48 kDa.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Significant differences in serum autoantibodies against optic nerve antigens were found in dogs with versus without GDRG. Although it remains unclear whether these differences were part of the pathogenesis of disease or were sequelae to glaucomatous changes, these findings provide support for the hypothesis that immune-mediated mechanisms play a role in the development or progression of GDRG. However, the high degree of variability among individual dogs and the considerable overlap between groups suggest that the clinical usefulness of this technique for distinguishing dogs with GDRG from clinically normal dogs is likely limited.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine central corneal thickness (total corneal thickness [TCT], epithelial thickness [ET], and stromal thickness [ST]), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and intraocular pressure (IOP) in Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii).

DESIGN

Prospective cross-sectional study.

ANIMALS

25 healthy rehabilitated juvenile Kemp's ridley sea turtles.

PROCEDURES

Body weight and straight-line standard carapace length (SCL) were recorded. All turtles underwent a complete anterior segment ophthalmic examination. Central TCT, ET, ST, and ACD were determined by use of a spectral-domain optical coherence tomography device. Intraocular pressure was determined with a rebound tonometer; the horse setting was used to measure IOP in all 25 turtles, and the undefined setting was also used to measure IOP in 20 turtles. For each variable, 3 measurements were obtained bilaterally. The mean was calculated for each eye and used for analysis purposes.

RESULTS

The mean ± SD body weight and SCL were 3.85 ± 1.05 kg (8.47 ± 2.31 lb) and 29 ± 3 cm, respectively. The mean ± SD TCT, ET, ST, and ACD were 288 ± 23 μm, 100 ± 6 μm, 190 ± 19 μm, and 581 ± 128 μm, respectively. Mean ± SD IOP was 6.5 ± 1.0 mm Hg when measured with the horse setting and 3.8 ± 1.1 mm Hg when measured with the undefined setting.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results provided preliminary reference ranges for objective assessment of ophthalmic variables in healthy juvenile Kemp's ridley sea turtles.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association