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  • Author or Editor: Christine M. Budke x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess signalment and concurrent disease processes in dogs with aortic thrombotic disease (ATD).

DESIGN Retrospective case-control study.

ANIMALS Dogs examined at North American veterinary teaching hospitals from 1985 through 2011 with medical records submitted to the Veterinary Medical Database.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to identify dogs with a diagnosis of ATD (case dogs). Five control dogs without a diagnosis of ATD were then identified for every case dog. Data were collected regarding dog age, sex, breed, body weight, and concurrent disease processes.

RESULTS ATD was diagnosed in 291 of the 984,973 (0.03%) dogs included in the database. The odds of a dog having ATD did not differ significantly by sex, age, or body weight. Compared with mixed-breed dogs, Shetland Sheepdogs had a significantly higher odds of ATD (OR, 2.59). Protein-losing nephropathy (64/291 [22%]) was the most commonly recorded concurrent disease in dogs with ATD.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Dogs with ATD did not differ significantly from dogs without ATD in most signalment variables. Contrary to previous reports, cardiac disease was not a common concurrent diagnosis in dogs with ATD.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a questionnaire for obtaining owner-perceived, weighted quality-oflife assessments for dogs with spinal cord injuries.

Design—Evaluation study.

Animals—100 dogs with spinal cord injuries and 48 healthy control dogs.

Procedures—The questionnaire was adapted from a questionnaire (the schedule for the evaluation of individual quality of life–direct weighting) used for human patients. Specifically, owners were asked to identify 5 areas or activities they believed had the most influence on their dogs' quality of life, assess their dogs' current status in each of those areas, and provide a weighting for the importance of each area. Results were used to construct a weighted quality-of-life score ranging from 0 to 100 for each dog. Owners were also asked to provide a quality-of-life score with a visual analog scale (VAS).

Results—A good correlation was found between weighted and VAS quality-of-life scores. Dogs with spinal cord injuries had weighted quality-of-life scores that were significantly lower than scores for control dogs. Quality-of-life areas and activities provided by owners of dogs with spinal cord injuries were similar to areas and activities provided by owners of healthy control dogs and could mostly be encompassed by 5 broader domains: mobility, play or mental stimulation, health, companionship, and other.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that the questionnaire could be used to obtain owner-perceived, weighted quality-of-life assessments for dogs with spinal cord injuries. Obtaining owner-perceived quality-of-life assessments for individual dogs should allow veterinarians to better address quality-of-life concerns and expectations of owners.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate changes over time in owner-perceived, weighted quality-of-life assessments in dogs with spinal cord injuries and determine whether scores were associated with underlying etiology or with veterinarian-assigned scores for severity of neurologic dysfunction.

Design—Cohort study.

Animals—100 dogs with spinal cord injury.

Procedures—Duration of dysfunction, modified Frankel neurologic injury score, and etiology were recorded. At initial and recheck (4- to 6-week) evaluations, owners were asked to identify 5 areas or activities they believed had the most influence on their dogs' quality of life, assess their dogs' current status in each area, and provide a weighting for the importance of each area; results were used to construct a weighted quality-of-life score. Owners were also asked to provide a quality-of-life score with a visual analog scale (VAS).

Results—At initial and recheck evaluations, weighted quality-of-life scores were higher for ambulatory than for nonambulatory dogs. However, scores did not differ among groups when dogs were grouped on the basis of underlying etiology or duration of injury. Dogs with an increase in Frankel score between the initial and recheck evaluations had a significant increase in weighted quality-of-life score, whereas for dogs that did not have any change in Frankel score, initial and recheck weighted quality-of-life scores were not significantly different.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that owner-assigned, weighted quality-of-life scores for dogs with spinal cord injuries did not vary significantly on the basis of underlying etiology or duration of injury but were higher for ambulatory than for nonambulatory dogs.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association