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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To identify knowledge and practices related to rabies vaccination and serologic monitoring among animal care workers in the United States.

DESIGN Cross-sectional survey.

SAMPLE 2,334 animal care workers (ie, veterinarians, veterinary technicians, animal control workers, and wildlife rehabilitators).

PROCEDURES Participants were contacted through relevant professional organizations to participate in an anonymous web-based survey. The survey collected demographic and occupational information, animal handling and potential rabies exposure information, and individual rabies vaccination and serologic monitoring practices. Comparisons of animal bite and rabies exposure rates were made between occupational groups. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with rabies vaccination status and adherence to serologic monitoring recommendations.

RESULTS Respondents reported 0.77 animal bites/person-year or 0.10 bites/1,000 animals handled. The overall rate of postexposure prophylaxis due to an occupational rabies exposure was 1.07/100 person-years. Veterinarians reported the highest rabies vaccination rate (98.7% [367/372]), followed by animal control workers (78.5% [344/438]), wildlife rehabilitators (78.2% [122/156]), and veterinary technicians (69.3% [937/1,352]). Respondents working for employers requiring rabies vaccination and serologic monitoring were 32.16 and 6.14 times, respectively, as likely to be vaccinated or have a current serologic monitoring status as were respondents working for employers without such policies.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that, given the high reported rates of animal bites and potential rabies exposures among animal care workers, improvements in rabies vaccination and serologic monitoring practices are needed.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate feline injection site-associated sarcoma (FISAS) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (FOSCC) cells in 3-D hydrogel-based cell cultures to determine chemosensitivity to carboplatin at concentrations comparable to those eluted from carboplatin-impregnated calcium sulfate hemihydrate (C-ICSH) beads.

SAMPLE

2 immortalized cell lines, each from a histologically confirmed primary FISAS and FOSCC.

PROCEDURES

Hydrogels (10% wt/vol) were formed via UV exposure from methacrylamide-functionalized gelatin dissolved in PBSS. For each cell line, approximately 100,000 cells were encapsulated per hydrogel. Three cell-seeded 3-D hydrogels were evaluated for each carboplatin concentration (0, 150, 300, 450, and 600 µM) across 3 experiments. Drug efficacy was assessed by luminescence assay 72 hours after treatment. Growth of tumor cells treated with 300 µM or 600 µM carboplatin was evaluated using live-cell morphology imaging and confocal microscopy at 3, 7, and 14 days after treatment.

RESULTS

Mean half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for FISAS and FOSCC cells ranged from 123 to 171 µM and 155 to 190 µM, respectively, based on luminescence assay. Viability at 3, 7, and 14 days for both cell lines at 300 µM carboplatin was 50%, 25%, and 5% and at 600 µM carboplatin was 25%, 10%, and < 5%.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

3-D hydrogel cell culture systems supported growth of feline tumor cells for determination of in vitro chemosensitivity. IC50s of each cell line were within the range of carboplatin concentrations eluted from C-ICSH beads. Cells from FISAS and FOSCC cell lines treated with carboplatin showed dose-dependent and time-dependent decreases in viability.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research