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  • Author or Editor: Christine C. Lim x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate orally administered famciclovir for treatment of cats with experimentally induced disease attributable to feline herpesvirus type-1 (FHV-1).

Animals—16 nonvaccinated specific-pathogen-free cats.

Procedures—Cats were treated orally with famciclovir (90 mg/kg; n = 10) or a similar volume of lactose (400 mg; 6) 3 times/d for 21 days. Cats were inoculated with FHV-1 and administered the first treatment dose on day 0. Disease score; weight; results of urinalysis, serum biochemical analysis, and CBC; histologic conjunctivitis score; herpetic DNA shedding; goblet cell density; anti-FHV-1 antibody concentration; and plasma penciclovir concentration were measured.

Results—On days 4 to 18 following inoculation, disease scores were lower in famciclovir-treated cats than in lactose-treated cats. Lactose-treated cats decreased in weight during the first 7 days after inoculation, but famciclovir-treated cats increased in weight throughout the study. Percentage change in weight was greater in famciclovir-treated cats on days 7 and 14 than in lactose-treated cats. Serum globulin concentration was lower on days 3 through 9, conjunctivitis histologic score was lower on day 14, herpetic DNA was shed less frequently throughout the study, goblet cell density was greater on day 21, and circulating anti-FHV-1 antibody concentration at study end was lower in famciclovir-treated cats, compared with these measurements in lactose-treated cats. Approximate peak plasma penciclovir concentration was 2.0 μg/mL.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Famciclovir administration improved outcomes for systemic, ophthalmic, clinicopathologic, virologic, and histologic variables in cats experimentally infected with FHV-1. Adjunctive topical mucinomimetic and antimicrobial treatments may also be necessary.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) on tear film breakup time (TFBUT) and Schirmer tear test (STT) values in cats with primary experimental infection and to determine the relationship betweenTFBUT and STT values and conjunctival goblet cell density (GCD).

Sample Population—9 specific-pathogen–free cats of approximately 6 months of age.

Procedures—6 cats were inoculated with FHV-1; 3 control cats were sham inoculated. Clinical and histologic evidence of conjunctivitis and TFBUT, GCD, and STT values were assessed at multiple times until postinoculation day (PID) 29.

Results—In infected cats, mean clinical and histologic conjunctivitis scores peaked at PID 7 and remained above baseline at PID 29. In control cats, these 2 variables did not change from baseline throughout the study. MeanTFBUT declined rapidly in infected cats up to PID 15 and at PID 29 remained less than baseline, less than for control cats, and below refer-ence range values. Mean STT value for infected cats at PID 29 was increased from baseline but was within the reference range and not different from the value for control cats. Mean GCD in infected cats declined precipitously by PID 7 and remained below reference range values at PID 29. Mean GCD in control cats remained unchanged for the duration of the study period.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—FHV-1 induced qualitative tear film abnormalities in experimentally infected cats, as measured by TFBUT and GCD. Assessment of TFBUT provided a reasonable clinical estimate of GCD.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess student awareness of the financial costs of pursuing a veterinary education, to determine student expectations for financial returns of a veterinary career, and to identify associations between student debt and factors such as future career plans or personality type.

Design—Survey.

Sample—First-year veterinary students at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine.

Procedures—In 2013, prior to the first day of class, all incoming first-year students received an email invitation to complete an online survey. The survey contained questions about demographics, current financial situation, current debt, expected debt at graduation, expected annual income following graduation, intent to pursue specialty training, and Myers-Briggs personality type.

Results—72 of 102 (71%) students completed the survey; 65 respondents answered all relevant questions and provided usable data. Student responses for expected debt at graduation were comparable to national averages for veterinary college graduates; responses for expected annual income following graduation were lower than averages for University of Minnesota veterinary college graduates and national averages. However, students predicted even lower annual income if they did not attend veterinary college. Expected debt and expected annual income were not correlated with factors such as personality type or future career plans.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that first-year veterinary students were aware of the financial costs of their veterinary education and had realistic expectations for future salaries. For typical veterinary students, attending veterinary college appeared to be financially worthwhile, given lower expected earnings otherwise. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2015;247:196–203)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate signalment, clinical signs, treatment, and factors affecting visual prognosis in dogs with uveodermatologic syndrome (UDS).

DESIGN Retrospective case series and nested cohort study.

ANIMALS 50 dogs (37 Akitas and 13 non-Akitas) with UDS evaluated at 4 ophthalmology practices.

PROCEDURES Data were collected from the medical records regarding signalment, clinical signs, biopsy results, medications, adverse effects, vision and glaucoma status at initial and subsequent examinations, and duration of follow-up. Various factors were examined for associations with development of blindness or glaucoma following initial examination.

RESULTS The most common ophthalmic signs included aqueous flare (n = 35 [70%]), iris abnormalities (29 [58%]), retinal detachment (23 [46%]), and choroidal depigmentation or chorioretinal infiltrates (10 [20%]). At initial examination, 36% (18/50) of dogs had glaucoma and 57% (26/46) were blind in both eyes. Twenty-five (50%) dogs had vision at their final visit, representing 78% of the 32 dogs that had vision at initial examination or regained vision during the follow-up period. In dogs that lost vision, median time to permanent blindness in both eyes was 13.5 months (range, 0.4 to 59 months) after initial examination. No significant associations with time to glaucoma or vision loss were identified for signalment variables, specific medications, or duration of clinical signs prior to initial examination.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE UDS commonly resulted in glaucoma, vision loss, or both in affected dogs. No evaluated factor was associated with visual prognosis; however, a subset of patients maintained vision through to the final recheck examination.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate outcomes for cats treated with orally administered famciclovir 3 times/d for clinical signs attributed to naturally occurring feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) infection and to assess variables related to owner satisfaction with the treatment.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 59 client-owned cats.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to identify cats treated for presumed FHV-1 infection from 2006 through 2013 with ≥ 1 follow-up visit. Signalment, duration of clinical signs, prior treatment, examination findings, diagnostic test results, concurrent treatments, and outcome data were recorded. Owners were asked to complete a survey regarding patient- and treatment-related variables. Data were compared between cats that received low (approx 40 mg/kg [18 mg/lb]) and high (approx 90 mg/kg [41 mg/lb]) doses of famciclovir, PO, 3 times/d.

RESULTS Patient age ranged from 0.03 to 16 years. Conjunctivitis (51/59 [86%]), keratitis (51 [86%]), blepharitis (19 [32%]), nasal discharge or sneezing (10 [17%]), and dermatitis (4 [7%]) were common findings. Clinical improvement was subjectively graded as marked in 30 (51%) cats, mild in 20 (34%), and nonapparent in 9 (15%). Median time to improvement was significantly shorter, and degree of improvement was significantly greater in the highdose group than in the low-dose group. Adverse effects potentially attributable to famciclovir administration were reported for 10 cats. On the basis of survey responses, most (29/32 [91%]) owners were satisfied with their cat's treatment.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Famciclovir at the prescribed dosages was associated with improved clinical signs in cats with presumed FHV-1 infection, and few adverse effects were attributed to the treatment. Further studies are needed to assess whether a famciclovir dosage of 90 versus 40 mg/kg, PO, 3 times/d would result in increased efficacy and shorter treatment time.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To investigate long-term outcomes and owner-perceived quality of life associated with sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) in dogs.

Design—Survey study.

Animals—100 dogs with SARDS examined at 5 academic veterinary institutions from 2005 to 2010.

Procedures—The diagnosis was based on documented acute vision loss, normal results of ophthalmic examinations, and evaluation of extinguished bright-flash electroretinograms. Primary owners of affected dogs completed a questionnaire addressing outcome measures including vision, systemic signs, and perceived quality of life for their dogs.

Results—Age at diagnosis was significantly correlated with positive outcome measures; dogs in which SARDS was diagnosed at a younger age were more likely to have alleged partial vision and higher owner-perceived quality of life. Polyphagia was the only associated systemic sign found to increase in severity over time. Medical treatment was attempted in 22% of dogs; visual improvement was not detected in any. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported an improved relationship with their dog after diagnosis, and 95% indicated they would discourage euthanasia of dogs with SARDS.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Blindness and concurrent systemic signs associated with SARDS appeared to persist indefinitely, but only polyphagia increased in severity over time. Most owners believed their pets had good quality of life and would discourage euthanasia of dogs with SARDS.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association