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  • Author or Editor: Christina J. Cocca x
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Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION Two Pembroke Welsh Corgis with gastrointestinal signs including inappetence, diarrhea, lethargy, and hypersalivation were referred for evaluation.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Diagnostic testing included abdominal ultrasonography and CT angiography. One patient had a cranial mesenteric artery-to-mesenteric vein fistula with multiple acquired extrahepatic portosystemic shunts. The second patient had both cranial and caudal mesenteric artery-to-mesenteric vein fistulas and multiple acquired extrahepatic portosystemic shunts.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Both patients underwent minimally invasive coil embolization of the mesenteric arterioportal fistulas, with complete occlusion confirmed by means of angiography at procedure completion. Clinical outcome approximately 1 year after treatment was assessed as fair to good because of recurrence of clinical signs that required medical management in 1 dog and some persistent serum biochemical abnormalities.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Outcome for the 2 patients described suggested that coil embolization may be a feasible and effective minimally invasive technique for the treatment of mesenteric arterioportal fistulas in dogs. However, further investigation of the potential for chronic hepatic disease in patients with a history of acquired portosystemic shunts is warranted.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate effects of bite distance of an interlocking horizontal mattress epitendinous suture (IHMES) from the repair site on tensile strength of canine tendon repairs.

SAMPLE

72 canine cadaveric superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs).

PROCEDURES

Transverse tenotomy was performed, and SDFTs were repaired with a locking-loop construct (LL construct) or 3 LL constructs with IHMES suture bites placed 5 (LL + 5ES construct), 10 (LL + 10ES construct), or 15 (LL + 15ES construct) mm from the transection site (18 SDFTs/group). Constructs were loaded to failure. Load at 1− and 3-mm gapping, yield force, failure load, and failure mode were evaluated.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD yield force and failure load for LL constructs were significantly lower than for IHMES constructs. Load at 1− and 3-mm gapping was significantly higher for IHMES constructs. Increasing the bite distance significantly increased construct strength (134.4 ± 26.1 N, 151.0 ± 16.8 N, and 182.1 ± 23.6 N for LL + 5ES, LL + 10ES, and LL + 15ES constructs, respectively), compared with strength for the LL construct. Failure mode differed significantly among constructs when an IHMES was used.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Addition of an IHMES to an LL construct led to increased ultimate tensile strength by 2.5 times and significantly reduced gap formation. Increasing the IHMES bite distance increased yield force by 2.1, 2.3, and 2.7 times for bites placed 5, 10, and 15 mm from the tenotomy, respectively. Positioning an IHMES at a greater distance from the repair site provided superior biomechanical strength for tendon repairs in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To report the clinical outcomes of the use of acellular fish skin grafts (FSGs) for the management of complex soft tissue wounds of various etiologies in dogs and cats.

ANIMALS

13 dogs and 4 cats with complex wounds treated with FSGs between February 2019 and March 2021.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed for information regarding cause, location, size of the wound, management techniques, complications, and clinical outcomes.

RESULTS

In dogs, the number of FSG applications ranged from 1 to 4 (median, 2 graft applications). The time between each application ranged from 4 to 21 days (median, 9.5 days). Time to application of the first FSG ranged from 9 to 210 days (median, 19 days). Wounds closed by second-intention healing following the first fish skin application between 26 and 145 days (median, 71 days; n = 12). In cats, 1 or 2 FSGs were used, and the wounds of 3 of 4 cats healed completely by secondary intention. The wounds of 1 dog and 1 cat did not heal. There were no adverse events attributed to the use of the FSGs.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

For dogs and cats of the present study, complete healing of most wounds occurred with the use of FSGs, the application of which did not require special training, instruments, or bandage materials.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research