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  • Author or Editor: Christina A. Hewes x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome for equids with cutaneous neoplasms treated with cisplatin-containing biodegradable beads, alone or in conjunction with debulking.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—56 horses, 1 zebra, 1 donkey, and 1 mule.

Procedures—Medical records were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone conversations with owners and trainers of the animals.

Results—22 tumors were sarcoids, 6 were fibrosarcomas, 1 was a fibroma, 2 were peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 11 were squamous cell carcinomas, 14 were melanomas (13 gray horses and 1 bay horse), 1 was a lymphosarcoma, 1 was an adenocarcinoma, and 1 was a basal cell tumor. Forty-five (76%) animals underwent conventional or laser debulking of the tumor prior to bead implantation. Forty of 48 (83%) animals for which long-term follow-up information was available were relapse free 2 years after treatment. This included 20 of 22 animals with spindle cell tumors (including 11/13 horses with sarcoids), 6 of 10 animals with squamous cell carcinomas, 13 of 14 animals with melanomas, and 2 of 3 animals with other tumor types. Adverse effects were minimal.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that implantation of cisplatin-containing biodegradable beads, with or without tumor debulking, may be an effective treatment for equidae with various cutaneous neoplasms.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided desmoplasty with simultaneous fasciotomy for proximal suspensory desmitis (ie, desmitis of the origin of the suspensory ligament) in horses that have not responded to stall rest.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—27 horses.

Procedures—Medical records of horses with proximal suspensory desmitis treated by means of desmoplasty with fasciotomy were reviewed. Follow-up information was obtained through telephone conversations with owners and trainers of the horses or by examination of horses at the hospital.

Results—23 of the 27 (85%) horses, including 3 of 4 horses with forelimb lesions and 20 of 23 horses with hind limb lesions, were able to return to full work after surgery and rehabilitation. All horses had ultrasonographic evidence of healing of suspensory ligament lesions.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that desmoplasty with fasciotomy is a viable treatment option in horses with proximal suspensory desmitis that have not responded to stall rest.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association