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  • Author or Editor: Christiana Fischer x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To prospectively compare the effectiveness and any adverse effects of apo-morphine administered SC or IV for induction of emesis in dogs.

ANIMALS

42 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Dogs for which emesis induction was deemed appropriate by the attending clinician were prospectively randomized to receive apomorphine (0.03 mg/kg [0.01 mg/lb]) either SC (n = 20) or IV (22). Data collected included whether emesis was successfully induced, time from drug administration to emesis, number of emetic events, and adverse events (eg, sedation, protracted vomiting, or other).

RESULTS

Of the 20 dogs given apomorphine SC, 16 (80%) vomited. Of the 22 dogs given apomorphine IV, 18 (82%) vomited. With regard to route of administration, the number of dogs in which emesis was induced did not differ significantly. Median time to the first emetic event was 13.5 minutes (range, 3 to 32 minutes) in the SC treatment group and 2 minutes (range, 1 to 5 minutes) in the IV treatment group; the difference was significant. There was no significant difference in the number of emetic events or frequency of adverse events between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Apomorphine administered SC or IV reliably induced emesis in dogs. Compared with SC administration of apomorphine, the time from drug administration to emesis associated with IV administration was significantly shorter, a finding that has clinical importance. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2021;259:283–287)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To prospectively assess the efficacy of emesis induction for the recovery of gastric foreign objects in cats and to determine if any factors influenced recovery.

ANIMALS

22 client-owned cats.

PROCEDURES

Cats for which emesis induction was deemed appropriate were administered an emetic agent by the attending clinician between October 2018 and April 2021. Data collected included whether emesis was successful in recovery in some or all of the foreign object, time from administration to emesis, number of emetic events, and type, length, width, and surface area of the material ingested.

RESULTS

Of the 22 cats that had emesis attempted, 11 (50%) vomited some or all of the foreign object. The time from ingestion to presentation, time from the last meal, presence of food in the vomitus, type of the object, and length, width, and surface area of the object did not influence the likelihood of successful recovery with emesis induction. The most common object cats ingested were rubber bands.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Recovery of gastric foreign objects in cats with emesis induction alone may be successful 50% of the time. The type and size of the object is unlikely to influence whether or not emesis will be successful. This information can help prepare cat-owners for expectations and outcomes following attempts at emesis induction.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association