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  • Author or Editor: Charles M. Stuhr x
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Abstract

Case Description—A great horned owl of estimated age < 1 year that was captured by wildlife rehabilitators was evaluated because of suspected cataracts.

Clinical Findings—Nuclear and incomplete cortical cataracts were evident in both eyes. Ocular ultrasonography revealed no evidence of retinal detachment, and electroretinography revealed normal retinal function.

Treatment and Outcome—For visual rehabilitation, cataract surgery was planned and intraocular lens design was determined on the basis of values obtained from the schematic eye, which is a mathematical model representing a normal eye for a species. Cataract surgery and intraocular lens placement were performed in both eyes. After surgery, refraction was within −0.75 diopters in the right eye and −0.25 diopters in the left eye. Visual rehabilitation was evident on the basis of improved tracking and feeding behavior, and the owl was eventually released into the wild.

Clinical Relevance—In raptors with substantial visual compromise, euthanasia or placement in a teaching facility is a typical outcome because release of such a bird is unacceptable. Successful intraocular lens implantation for visual rehabilitation and successful release into the wild are achievable.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine whether intracameral injection of carbachol at the completion of phacoemulsification in dogs would prevent the increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) that can develop during the first 24 hours after surgery.

Design

Randomized controlled trial.

Animals

32 adult dogs undergoing elective unilateral or bilateral phacoemulsification.

Procedure

Dogs were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups with 8 dogs/group: phacoemulsification and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of 0.01 % carbachol at the end of surgery; phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation, and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of 0.01 % carbachol; phacoemulsification and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of balanced salt solution; and phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation, and intracameral administration of 0.5 ml of balanced salt solution. Intraocular pressure was measured at 3 and 6 hours and the morning after surgery. Aqueous flare was also measured 6 hours and the morning after surgery.

Results

None of the dogs treated with carbachol developed postoperative ocular hypertension (ie, IOP > 27 mm of Hg), whereas 12 of 16 control dogs had ocular hypertension 3 hours after surgery. Intraocular pressure 3 hours after surgery was not significantly associated with phacoemulsification time or phacoemulsification power or with whether the dog received an intraocular lens implant. Severity of aqueous flare was similar for treated and control dogs.

Clinical Implications

Results suggested that intracameral administration of 0.01 % carbachol at the end of surgery was a safe and efficacious method of preventing the postoperative increase in IOP associated with phacoemulsification in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212:1885–1888)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize features and response to treatment of keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) associated with oral administration of etodolac in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Sample Population—65 cases obtained from a survey of veterinary ophthalmologists (group A) and 146 cases reported to Fort Dodge Animal Health (group B).

Procedures—Data analyzed included breed, sex, age, weight, dose and duration of etodolac administration, results of Schirmer tear test at the time of diagnosis and last follow-up, treatments, and response to treatments. Groups A and B were analyzed separately by use of forward stepwise logistic regression models developed to predict probability of complete remission or clinical improvement as a function of several variables.

Results—Most dogs developed severe KCS (84 eyes of 50 dogs [group A]; 111 eyes of 62 dogs [group B]). Resolution of KCS occurred in 7 of 65 (A) and 23 of 146 (B) dogs. No response to treatment was observed in 26 of 65 (A) and 27 of 146 (B) dogs. Fifty-one (A) and 52 (B) dogs had records that were sufficiently complete to use in models. In group B, dogs with etodolac treatment intervals < 6 months prior to the onset of KCS were 4.2 times as likely to have remission as were dogs with treatment intervals ≥ 6 months.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Shorter duration of etodolac administration (< 6 months) was associated with improved outcome in 1 population of dogs. Monitoring of tear production should be considered prior to and during administration of etodolac in dogs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association