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Abstract

Objective

To evaluate effects of treatment with a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on healing of open and sutured wounds, clinicopathologic variables, and CNS activity of dogs.

Animals

12 adult female Beagles.

Procedure

Open and sutured wounds were created in the skin of the trunk of the dogs. Dogs were divided into 2 groups. One group received PEMF treatment and 1 group served as untreated (control) dogs. The PEMF-treated dogs received treatment twice a day starting the day before surgery and lasting through day 21 after surgery. Wounds were evaluated by use of tensiometry, planimetry, laser Doppler perfusion imaging, and histologic examination. Clinicopathologic variables and electroencephalographic tracings were also evaluated.

Results

Use of PEMF treatment resulted in significantly enhanced epithelialization of open wounds 10 and 15 days after surgery. Five days after surgery, wounds of control dogs had a negative value for wound contraction, whereas PEMF-treated wounds had a positive value. The PEMF treatment did not cause significant changes in short-term planimetric, perfusion, tensiometric, histologic, clinicopathologic, or electroencephalographic results.

Conclusions

The PEMF treatment enhanced wound epithelialization in open cutaneous wounds and provided indications of early contraction without significant short-term changes in other variables. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:1177-1181)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Objectives

To ascertain the effects of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids on biochemical and histopathologic components of the inflammatory stage of wound healing.

Animals

30 purpose-bred Beagles.

Procedure

Dogs were allotted to 5 groups of 6. Each group was fed a unique dietary fatty acid ratio of omega-6 to n-3—diet A, 5.3:1; diet B, 10.4:1; diet C, 24.1:1; diet D, 51.6:1; and diet E, 95.8:1. Dogs were fed once daily for 12 weeks, then biopsy specimens were taken from 4-day-old wounds of each dog and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for: prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) metabolites, and ratios of omega-6 to n-3 fatty acids, arachidonic acid (AA) to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), adrenic acid to docosahexaenoic acid, and PGE2 to prostaglandin E3 (PGE3) metabolites.

Results

Qualitative analysis was carried out on AA, EPA, adrenic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and the major metabolite from the PGE2 and PGE3 pathway. These molecules were further quantified with respect to diet to determine significant differences. By analysis of the AA-to-EPA ratio, diet A was different from diets D and E and diets B and C were different from diet E (P < 0.05). By analysis of the PGE2-to-PGE3 metabolite ratio, diet A was different from diet E (P < 0.05). Though biochemical analysis indicated dietary dependence, histopathologic data indicated no significant difference with respect to diet groups.

Conclusion

The biochemical component of the inflammatory stage of wound healing can be manipulated by diet.

Clinical Relevance

Omega-3 fatty acid-enriched diets can be used to control inflammation associated with dermatologic conditions. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:859–863)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To ascertain the effects of locally injected immunostimulant and tripeptide-copper complex (TCC) on improving healing of pad wounds.

Design

Wounds in pads of large dogs were injected with either medication or physiologic saline solution (controls). Healing was evaluated.

Animals

12 mature English Pointers.

Procedure

Full-thickness 6 × 8-mm wounds in metatarsal and third and fourth digital pads were injected with immunostimulant or TCC at 0, 3, and 6 days after wounding. Wounds on control dogs were injected with physiologic saline solution. Using planimetric measurements at 0, 3, 6, 14, and 21 days, rates of healing were evaluated. Biopsy of the digital pad wounds at 3, 6, and 14 days was used to evaluate collagen content by hydroxyproline analysis. Biopsy specimens were also evaluated for type-I and type-III collagen, using Sirius red differential staining.

Results

Effect on healing rate and hydroxyproline content was best during the first week for immunostimulant. Immunostimulant- and TCC-injected wounds had more type-I collagen than did controls at 6 days; TCC-injected wounds had the most type-I collagen. At 14 days, the amount of type-I collagen in TCC-injected wounds was significantly greater than that in other wounds.

Conclusions

Tested medications had positive effects on healing of pad wounds.

Clinical Relevance

Intralesional injection of medications helps ensure their presence for enhancement of wound healing. The benefit could be lost with topical use in a bandage if the bandage is lost or becomes wet.(Am J Vet Res 1996;57:394-399)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research