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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—3 sets of monozygotic twins resulting from transfers of single embryos to recipient mares were examined.

Clinical Findings—In all 3 recipient mares with twin pregnancies, only 1 embryonic vesicle was detected before day 25 of gestation. In 1 recipient mare, 2 apparent adjacent vesicles, each containing an embryo with a heartbeat, were visualized on ultrasonographic examination on day 37 of gestation. The other 2 recipient mares underwent ultrasonographic examination on day 30 of gestation, at which time only 1 vesicle and embryo was identified. In these latter 2 recipient mares, however, a thorough ultrasonographic examination for a second conceptus on day 30 had not been performed, as only 1 embryo had been transferred and visualized on early ultrasonographic examination.

Treatment and Outcome—All twin pregnancies resulted in death of both fetuses. Genetic analysis confirmed that each set of monozygotic twins originated from the transferred embryo.

Clinical Relevance—Monozygotic twin pregnancy may occur after embryo transfer; thus recipient mares should be examined thoroughly for multiple conceptuses, especially between 25 and 30 days of gestation. At this time, the allantoides of monozygotic twins should be visible ultrasonographically and effective management may still be possible.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—6 geldings and 5 stallions were evaluated from January 2007 through April 2009 for the following conditions requiring phallectomy: chronic paraphimosis (n = 7), squamous cell carcinoma of the penis (3), and priapism (1).

Clinical Findings—None of the 7 horses with paraphimosis was able to retract the penis. Chronicity of the paraphimosis in 6 horses ranged from 2 weeks to 2 months and was unknown in the seventh horse. Horses with paraphimosis had been medically treated without success. The horse with priapism had developed the condition secondary to acepromazine administration 2 days prior to referral and was unsuccessfully treated once by intracavernosal administration of phenylephrine and irrigation of the cavernosal tissues prior to surgery. The 3 horses with squamous cell carcinoma of the penis had had the condition for 2 years and had been treated by repeated application of a cryogen or chemotherapeutic agent to the lesions.

Treatment and Outcome—All 11 horses underwent a partial phallectomy by means of a modified Vinsot technique. Modifications to the original technique included creation of a linear urethrostomy, alteration of the location and shape of the urethrostomy, application of a latex tourniquet, concurrent castration of stallions, and use of the procedure in standing horses. The procedure was technically easy to perform, well tolerated by the horses, and cosmetically acceptable to the owners, and had minimal postoperative complications. Long-term follow-up information was obtained from owners of 10 horses a median of 454 days after surgery; 2 owners reported mild urine scalding as the only adverse effect.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The modified Vinsot technique of partial phallectomy was effective and may be useful for horses that are unsuitable candidates for general anesthesia because of medical or owner financial constraints.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association