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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical signs, diagnostic findings, and outcome for horses with desmitis of the straight sesamoidean ligament (SSL) near its insertion on the middle phalanx.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—9 horses.

Procedure—Medical records were reviewed, and information on signalment, history, clinical signs, diagnostic findings, and treatment was obtained. Followup information was obtained through telephone conversations with owners.

Results—In all horses, the diagnosis was made by use of high-resolution ultrasonography. Seven horses had moderate lameness on initial examination; lameness was exacerbated in 6 horses following flexion of the distal limb joints. The cause of lameness could not be determined on the basis of clinical signs, and diagnostic local anesthesia was necessary to localize the source of lameness to the distal portion of the limb. Five horses had forelimb involvement (1 bilateral), and 4 had hind limb involvement (1 bilateral). Treatment consisted primarily of a 6-month rest and rehabilitation program. Six of the 9 horses were able to return to their intended use.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that injury to the SSL proximal to its insertion on the middle phalanx should be considered as a possible cause of lameness in horses, particularly performance horses, with lameness localized to the distal portion of the forelimb or hind limb that do not have any radiographic abnormalities. High-resolution ultrasonography was necessary to make the diagnosis. Horses with an acute injury appeared to have a reasonable chance of responding to treatment and returning to their intended use. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:973–977)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Limb symmetry was evaluated by measuring ground reaction forces in 2 groups of normal-gaited dogs at a trot. Data were collected from 2 groups of 21 dogs trotted at dog/handler velocities of 1.25 to 1.55 m/s and 1.85 to 2.05 m/s, respectively. Of these dogs, 9 participated in both groups to allow comparison of data at both velocities. Additionally, 16 of the dogs in group 1 were measured in 2 directions of movement to determine whether directional dependence was present. Collected data were then applied to 3 described symmetry indices.

Each index was easy to calculate, but all had limitations. A major limitation was variation in magnitude of ground reaction forces measured between the different axes and the effect of this variation on precision of the derived indices. Vertical ground forces provided the most consistent symmetry indices, in part because of their large magnitude. The indices indicated that no dog had perfect right-to-left symmetry during a trotting gait. Statistical differences were not found in any of the measurements of directional dependence. Likewise, comparing symmetry data in dogs trotted at both velocities indicated no significant differences in any axis.

However, further analysis of the data revealed the actual amount that a variance attributable to right-left limb variation was negligible. Most of the variance was attributable to trial variation. Thus, the aforementioned indices, which use nonconsecutive footfall methods to evaluate limb symmetry, actually measure principally trial variation and not limb-to-limb variation.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Casein has been used as a protein source in diets designed to dissolve canine ammonium urate uroliths and to prevent their recurrence, because it contains fewer purine precursors than do many other sources of protein. However, an important question is whether reduced quantities of dietary casein have any benefit in modifying saturation of urine with urates. To answer this question, activity productd ratios of uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate were determined in 24-hour urine samples produced by 6 healthy Beagles during periods of consumption of a 10.4% protein, casein-based (10.4% casein) diet and a 20.8% protein, casein-based (20.8% casein) diet. Significantly lower activity product. ratios of uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate were observed when dogs consumed the 10.4% casein diet. Significantly lower 24-hour urinary excretions of ammonia and phosphorus were observed when dogs consumed the 10.4% casein diet. Twenty-four-hour urinary excretions of magnesium and 24-hour urine pH values were significantly higher when dogs were fed the 10.4% casein diet. These results suggest that use of the 10.4% casein diet in protocols designed for dissolution and prevention of uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate uroliths in dogs may be beneficial.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Urine activity product ratios of uric acid (aprua), sodium urate (aprna), and ammonium urate (aprau), and urinary excretion of 10 metabolites were determined in 24-hour urine samples produced by 6 healthy Beagles during periods of consumption of 4 diets containing approximately 11% protein (dry weight) and various protein sources: a 72% moisture, casein-based diet; a 10% moisture, egg-based diet; a 72% moisture, chicken-based diet; and a 71% moisture, chicken-based, liver-flavored diet. Significantly (P < 0.05) higher aprua, aprna, and aprau were observed when dogs consumed the egg-based diet, compared with the other 3 diets; there were no differences in these ratios among the other 3 diets.

Twenty-four-hour urinary excretions of chloride, potassium, phosphorus, and oxalic acid were significantly (P < 0.05) higher when dogs consumed the egg-based diet. Twenty-four-hour urinary excretions of sodium were significantly (P < 0.05) higher when dogs consumed the egg-based diet, compared with the casein-based diet and the chicken-based, liver-flavored diet, but were not significantly different between the egg-based diet and chicken-based diet. Twenty-four-hour urine volume was similar when dogs consumed the 4 diets. Twenty-four-hour endogenous creatinine clearance was significantly (P < 0.05 lower when dogs consumed the casein based diet there were no differences among the other 3 diets. Although consumption all diets was associated with production alkaline urine, the 24-hour urine pH was significantly (P < 0.05) higher when dogs consumed the egg-based diet.

These results suggest that use diets containing approximately 10.5% protein (dry weight) and 70 moisture protocols designed for dissolution and prevention urate uroliths may be beneficial. The source dietary protein in canned formulated diets does not appear significantly influence the saturation of urine with uric acid, sodium urate, or ammonium urate.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Urine activity product ratios of uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate and urinary excretion of metabolites were determined in 24-hour samples produced by 6 healthy Beagles during periods of consumption of a low-protein, casein-based diet (diet A) and a high-protein, meat-based diet (diet B). Comparison of effects of diet A with those of diet B revealed: significantly lower activity product ratios of uric acid (P = 0.025), sodium urate (P = 0.045), and ammonium urate (P = 0.0045); significantly lower 24-hour urinary excretion of uric acid (P = 0.002), ammonia (P = 0.0002), sodium (P = 0.01), calcium (P = 0.005), phosphorus (P = 0.0003), magnesium (P = 0.01), and oxalic acid (P = 0.004); significantly (P = 0.0001) higher 24-hour urine pH; and significantly (P = 0.01) lower endogenous creatinine clearance. These results suggest that consumption of diet A minimizes changes in urine that predispose dogs to uric acid, sodium urate, and ammonium urate urolithiasis.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To describe the clinical characteristics, treatments, outcomes, and factors associated with survival time in a cohort of dogs with lingual neoplasia that underwent surgical excision.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—97 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with a lingual tumor examined between 1995 and 2008 were reviewed. Records were included if a lingual tumor was confirmed by histologic examination and surgical excision of the mass was attempted. Data were recorded and analyzed to identify prognostic factors.

Results—Clinical signs were mostly related to the oral cavity. For 93 dogs, marginal excision, subtotal glossectomy, and near-total glossectomy were performed in 35 (38%), 55 (59%), and 3 (3%), respectively. Surgery-related complications were rare, but 27 (28%) dogs had tumor recurrence. The most common histopathologic diagnoses for the 97 dogs were squamous cell carcinoma (31 [32%]) and malignant melanoma (29 [30%]). Eighteen (19%) dogs developed metastatic disease, and the overall median survival time was 483 days. Median survival time was 216 days for dogs with squamous cell carcinoma and 241 days for dogs with malignant melanoma. Dogs with lingual tumors ≥ 2 cm in diameter at diagnosis had a significantly shorter survival time than did dogs with tumors < 2 cm.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Similar to previous studies, results indicated that lingual tumors are most commonly malignant, and squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma predominate. A thorough physical examination to identify lingual tumors at an early stage and surgical treatment after tumor identification are recommended because tumor size significantly affected survival time.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association