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  • Author or Editor: Changbaig Hyun x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the haplotype distribution associated with the copper toxicosis gene and the segregation of the mutated allele in a Bedlington Terrier population in Australia.

Animals—131 Bedlington Terriers.

Procedure—Samples of DNA and RNA were obtained from each dog. Genetic status of each dog was evaluated by use of the DNA markers C04107; single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), which was adjacent to exon 2 of Murr1; and a deletion marker for exon 2. A subgroup of the study population was evaluated by use of biochemical and histologic techniques to elucidate the correlation between genotype and phenotype.

Results—We identified a recombination between the C04107 marker and Murr1 and a variation in a nucleotide in the splice site of exon 2 in our Bedlington Terrier cohort. Furthermore, we identified a novel haplotype associated with copper toxicosis in this cohort.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Our findings indicate that the deletion of exon 2 was not the sole cause of copper toxicosis, although only exon 2 deletion of Murr1 has been responsible for copper toxicosis in Bedlington Terriers. Although we failed to find a novel mutation in our cohort, we identified an affected dog family with an intact exon 2. Furthermore, we found that an SNP in the 5' splicing site of exon 2 may or may not be associated with a novel mutation of the Murr1 gene or other genes. Loss of linkage between the C04107 marker and the Murr1 gene was also identified in a certain family of dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1573–1579)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate serum cardiac biomarker concentrations and selected enzyme activities in dogs with experimentally induced bradyarrhythmias after short- (1-hour) and long- (3-hour) duration transcutaneous cardiac pacing (TCP).

Animals—10 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—In each dog, anesthesia was induced with propofol (5 mg/kg, IV) and maintained via inhalation of isoflurane in oxygen. To induce bradyarrhythmia, diltiazem was administered IV (20 to 50 mg/dog). Transcutaneous cardiac pacing was performed for 1 hour (5 dogs) or 3 hours (5 dogs) by use of an automated external cardiac pulse generator and a transdermal electrode. Serum concentrations of creatine kinase-MB fraction and cardiac troponin I and activities of aspartate transaminase, creatine kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase were evaluated the day before (baseline) and at intervals until 7 days after TCP.

Results—Increases (from baseline) in serum cardiac biomarker concentrations and enzyme activities were detected in the long-duration TCP group; changes in the short-duration TCP group were more minor and largely not significant. Although severity of myocardial and skeletal muscular injuries was apparently greater with greater duration of TCP, the injuries were not persistent; most variables were within reference range within 3 days after TCP.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that application of TCP for > 1 hour in dogs may cause myocardial and skeletal muscular injuries. Serum concentrations of creatine kinase-MB fraction and cardiac troponin I and activities of aspartate transaminase, creatine kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase should be more carefully monitored after TCP of > 1 hour's duration to evaluate potential myocardial damages.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research