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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether administration of meloxicam or acetylsalicylic acid alters glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in cats with renal azotemia.

Animals—6 young adult cats.

Procedures—3 sexually intact male cats and 3 sexually intact female cats had surgically reduced renal mass and azotemia comparable to International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease stages 2 and 3. Renal function was evaluated by measurement of serum creatinine concentration, urinary clearance of exogenously administered creatinine, and the urine protein-to-creatinine concentration ratio (UP:C). Measurements taken in cats receiving placebo at the beginning and end of the study were compared with results obtained at the end of 7 days of treatment with either meloxicam (0.2 mg/kg, SC, on day 1; 0.1 mg/kg, SC, on days 2 to 7) or acetylsalicylic acid (20 mg/kg, PO, on days 1, 4, and 7).

Results—No significant treatment effects on urinary clearance of exogenously administered creatinine, serum creatinine concentration, or UP:C were detected. Mean ± SEM serum creatinine concentration and urinary clearance of exogenously administered creatinine measurements following 7 days of treatment with meloxicam (serum creatinine concentration, 2.67 ± 0.17 mg/dL; urinary clearance of exogenously administered creatinine, 1.34 ± 0.08 mL/min/kg) and acetylsalicylic acid (serum creatinine concentration, 2.62 ± 0.12 mg/dL; urinary clearance of exogenously administered creatinine, 1.35 ± 0.07 mL/min/kg) were not significantly different from the mean baseline values for these variables (serum creatinine concentration, 2.77 ± 0.14 mg/dL; urinary clearance of exogenously administered creatinine, 1.36 ± 0.07 mL/min/kg).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Neither meloxicam nor acetylsalicylic acid had a measurable effect on urinary clearance of exogenously administered creatinine, serum creatinine concentration, or UP:C. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that GFR of euvolemic cats with normal or reduced renal function is not dependent on cyclooxygenase function.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of renal autograft ischemia and reperfusion associated with renal transplantation on pulse rate and pressure and arterial blood pressure variables in clinically normal cats.

Animals—10 cats.

Procedures—A radiotelemetric implant was placed in each cat to measure hemodynamic variables; baseline data were recorded before surgery. Standard heterotopic renal implantation and contralateral nephrectomy were performed (day 0). Autografts were stored in cold sucrose phosphate solution for 30 minutes (n = 5) or 3 hours (5); cats were anephric during this period. Hemodynamic variables were recorded every 5 minutes for up to 16 days after surgery; mean daily values were calculated.

Results—Data from 6 cats were available for analysis. Two cats developed ureteral obstructions and became azotemic at 111 and 197 hours after kidney reperfusion. Mean serum creatinine and BUN concentrations were greater than baseline values on days 1 and 2. Although changes from baseline hemodynamic values were detected in some cats, arterial blood pressure measurements did not change significantly from baseline at any time point. Compared with baseline data, mean pulse rate was increased on days 1 and 2 and days 6 through 12; mean pulse pressure was increased on days 1 and 2.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In clinically normal cats, hypertension was not induced by clinically relevant periods of ischemia-reperfusion injury of renal autografts and was not an inherent consequence of the transplantation process. Causes of marked posttransplantation hypertension in cats with chronic kidney disease require further investigation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor benazepril in cats with induced renal insufficiency.

Animals—32 cats.

Procedure—Renal mass was surgically reduced, and cats were assigned to 1 of 4 eight-cat groups. Group 1 received placebo, whereas groups 2, 3, and 4 received benazepril hydrochloride orally once daily for approximately 6.5 months at the following doses: group 2, 0.25 to 0.50 mg/kg of body weight; group 3, 0.50 to 1.00 mg/kg; and group 4, 1.00 to 2.00 mg/kg. Arterial blood pressures, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and renal plasma flow were determined before treatment and during the treatment period. Other determinants of renal hemodynamics were measured by use of micropuncture techniques. Renal biopsy specimens were examined microscopically.

Results—Compared with cats that received placebo, mean systolic arterial blood pressure was significantly less and GFR significantly greater in cats that received benazepril. Glomerular capillary pressure and the ratio of efferent to afferent arteriolar vascular resistance were also significantly less in treated cats. However, histologic differences in renal specimens were not detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Treatment with benazepril sustained single nephron GFR in remnant nephrons of cats with induced renal insufficiency. Administration of benazepril was also associated with a small but significant reduction in degree of systemic hypertension and an increase in whole kidney GFR. Benazepril may be an effective treatment to slow the rate of progression of renal failure in cats with renal disease. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:375–383)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor enalapril would lower systemic arterial and glomerular capillary pressure and reduce the magnitude of renal injury in a canine model of renal insufficiency.

Animals—18 adult dogs that had renal mass reduced by partial nephrectomy.

Procedure—After surgical reduction of renal mass and baseline measurements, dogs in 2 equal groups received either placebo (group 1) or enalapril (0.5 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h; group 2) for 6 months.

Results—Values for systemic mean arterial blood pressure determined by indirect and direct measurement after 3 and 6 months of treatment, respectively, were significantly lower in group 2 than in group 1. During treatment, monthly urine protein-to-creatinine ratios were consistently lower in group 2 than in group 1, although values were significantly different only at 3 months. At 6 months, significant reduction in glomerular capillary pressure in group 2 was detected, compared with group 1, but glomerular filtration rate in group 2 was not compromised. Glomerular hypertrophy, assessed by measurement of planar surface area of glomeruli, was similar in both groups. Glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions were significantly less in group 2, compared with group 1.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Data suggest that inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme was effective in modulating progressive renal injury, which was associated with reduction of glomerular and systemic hypertension and proteinuria but not glomerular hypertrophy. Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme may be effective for modulating progression of renal disease in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:321–327)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare 2 techniques of inducing combined renal insufficiency and systemic hypertension in cats.

Animals—22 cats 6 to 12 months of age.

Procedure—Cats were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Control (C) group cats had 2 intact kidneys, remnant kidney (RK) group cats underwent unilateral partial renal infarction and contralateral nephrectomy, and remnant-wrap (W) group cats underwent unilateral partial renal infarction and partial abtation and wrapping of the contralateral kidney. Systemic arterial blood pressure (BP) was measured continuously by use of implanted radiotelemetric devices. Renal function was assessed via determination of glomerular filtration rate, measurement of serum creatinine and BUN concentrations, and determination of urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (UP/C). Serum aldosterone concentration and plasma renin activity were measured on day 75.

Results—Systolic BP was significantly higher in groups RK and W than in group C, and systolic BP was significantly higher in group W than in group RK. Serum aldosterone concentration and plasma renin activity were significantly higher in group W, compared with groups C and RK. Glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in groups RK and W, compared with group C. Histologic indices of renal injury and UP/C were significantly higher in group W, compared with groups C and RK.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Hypertensive renal insufficiency in group W was characterized by marked sustained systemic hypertension, decreased renal function, proteinuria, activation of the reninangiotensin-aldosterone axis, and renal structural injury. Results support the hypothesis that marked systemic hypertension, activation of the reninangiotensin- aldosterone axis, and proteinuria may damage the kidney of cats with preexisting renal insufficiency. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1006–1013)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether administration of Crandell-Rees feline kidney (CRFK) cell lysates or vaccines against feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, and panleukopenia (FVRCP vaccines) that likely contain CRFK cell proteins induces antibodies against CRFK cell or feline renal cell (FRC) lysates in cats.

Animals—14 eight-week-old cats.

Procedure—Before and after the study, renal biopsy specimens were obtained from each cat for histologic evaluation. Each of 4 FVRCP vaccines was administered to 2 cats at weeks 0, 3, 6, and 50. Between weeks 0 and 50, another 3 pairs of cats received 11 CRFK cell lysate inoculations SC (10, 50, or 50 µg mixed with alum). Clinicopathologic evaluations and ELISAs to detect serum antibodies against CRFK cell or FRC lysates were performed at intervals.

Results—Cats had no antibodies against CRFK cell or FRC lysates initially. All cats administered CRFK cell lysate had detectable antibodies against CRFK cell or FRC lysates on multiple occasions. Of 6 cats vaccinated parenterally, 5 had detectable antibodies against CRFK cell lysate at least once, but all 6 had detectable antibodies against FRC lysate on multiple occasions. Cats administered an intranasal-intraocular vaccine did not develop detectable antibodies against either lysate. Important clinicopathologic or histologic abnormalities were not detected during the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Parenteral administration of vaccines containing viruses likely grown on CRFK cells induced antibodies against CRFK cell and FRC lysates in cats. Hypersensitization with CRFK cell proteins did not result in renal disease in cats during the 56-week study. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:506–511)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether amlodipine besylate decreases systemic arterial blood pressure (BP) and reduces the prevalence of complications in cats with induced hypertensive renal insufficiency.

Animals—20 cats with partial nephrectomy.

Procedure—Following reduction in renal mass, 10 cats were administered 0.25 mg of amlodipine/kg, PO, q 24 h (group A). Ten cats served as a control group (group C). Systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and mean BP (MBP), physical activity, and pulse rate were measured continuously for 36 days by use of radiotelemetric devices.

Results—Compared with values for clinically normal cats, SBP, DBP, and MBP were significantly increased in cats of group C. Cats in group A had significant reductions in SBP, DBP, and MBP, compared with values for cats in group C. Albuminuria but not urine protein- to-creatinine ratio was significantly correlated ( R 2 = 0.317) with SBP in hypertensive cats. Prevalence of ocular lesions attributable to systemic hypertension in group C (7 cats) was greater than that observed in group A (2). Two cats in group C were euthanatized on day 16 because of nuerologic complications attributed to systemic hypertension. One normotensive cat in group A was euthanatized because of purulent enteritis of unknown cause on day 27.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Amlodipine had an antihypertensive effect in cats with coexistent systemic hypertension and renal insufficiency. Its use may improve the prognosis for cats with systemic hypertension by decreasing the risk of ocular injury or neurologic complications induced by high BP. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:833–839)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research