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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate indicators of neutrophil activation in the blood of healthy and asthma-affected horses and assess associations between corticosteroid treatment and these variables.

ANIMALS

48 horses (14 with severe equine asthma [SEA], 21 with mild to moderate equine asthma [MEA], and 13 healthy controls).

PROCEDURES

In a 3-part retrospective study, hematology analyzer data for horses included in previous studies were reviewed. Neutrophil size, neutrophil light absorbance (NLA), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) index were recorded. Data for each variable were compared among groups for the entire study sample (part 1). Changes in each variable were assessed for one subset of horses (5 SEA-affected and 6 controls) after treatment for 2 weeks with dexamethasone (0.06 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h; part 2) and for another subset (8 SEA-affected horses) after the same treatment and after a 1-week post-treatment washout period (part 3).

RESULTS

All 3 variables were significantly greater for the SEA group, compared with the MEA and control groups in part 1. Following dexamethasone treatment, the control- and SEA-group NLA and MPO index significantly decreased and SEA-group neutrophil size significantly decreased in part 2; immediate posttreatment results for SEA-affected horses were similar in part 3, with significantly increased neutrophil size and nonsignificant increases in NLA and MPO index following washout.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested horses with exacerbated SEA have larger neutrophils that contain more MPO, compared with neutrophils of MEA-affected and healthy control horses. The clinical value of these variables for the diagnosis of equine asthma was deemed limited owing to data overlap among groups. (Am J Vet Res 2021;82:737–745)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To provide information about complication rates and the risk factors for complications with mandibulectomy and maxillectomy procedures in dogs.

ANIMALS

459 client-owned dogs that underwent a mandibulectomy or maxillectomy between January 1, 2007, and January 1, 2018.

PROCEDURES

Inclusion criteria included a complete medical record that contained an anesthesia record, surgical report, available histopathology results, and results of CBC and serum biochemical analysis before surgery. A minimum follow-up of 90 days after surgery was required.

RESULTS

271 complications occurred in 171 of 459 (37.3%) dogs. Eighteen complications were not given a severity description. Of the remaining 253 complications, most were considered minor (157/253 [62.1%]). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that only increased surgical time had a significant (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.54) association with the occurrence of ≥ 1 complication. For each additional hour of surgery, the odds of complications increased by 36%. Preoperative radiation therapy or chemotherapy increased the odds of incisional dehiscence or oral fistula formation (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.3 to 7.2). Additionally, undergoing maxillectomy, compared with mandibulectomy, increased the odds of incisional dehiscence or oral fistula formation (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.1). Two hundred forty-four of 271 (90.0%) complications occurred in the perioperative period (0 to 3 months after surgery).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Compared with mandibulectomy, performing maxillectomy increased the risk for incisional dehiscence or oral fistula formation. Mandibulectomy and maxillectomy had a moderate risk for a complication.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association