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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether an association exists between oral bacterial contamination of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and positive PCR assay results for the detection of Mycoplasma spp in BALF samples of dogs with lower respiratory tract (LRT; portion from the trachea to the lungs) disease.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—121 dogs with LRT disease.

Procedures—Medical records from January 2005 to April 2012 were reviewed. Dogs with LRT disease that had BALF samples evaluated by use of Mycoplasma-specific PCR assay, bacterial culture, and cytologic examination were included. Information on signalment, final diagnoses, and BALF testing results was extracted.

Results—83 (68.6%) dogs had BALF samples with negative PCR assay results for Mycoplasma spp, and 38 (31.4%) had positive results. The BALF samples with cytologic evidence of oral bacterial contamination were 5.1 times as likely to have positive Mycoplasma-specific PCR assay results as were noncontaminated samples. Compared with hound or herding dogs, other breeds were 13.6 times as likely to have positive PCR assay results. Dogs with bronchitis were less likely than dogs with other LRT diseases to have positive Mycoplasma-specific PCR assay results. No significant association was found between Mycoplasma-specific PCR assay results and bacterial culture results.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In dogs with LRT disease, Mycoplasma-specific PCR assay results for BALF samples should be interpreted in terms of possible oral bacterial contamination. Mycoplasma-specific PCR assay of BALF samples from herding dogs, hound dogs, and dogs with bronchitis may be less rewarding than for other dogs with LRT disease.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

The effect of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (t/smx, 30 mg/kg, po, q 12 h for 6 weeks) on thyroid function was evaluated in 21 dogs with pyoderma and normal baseline serum thyroxine concentrations. The population mean serum thyroxine concentration, but not the population mean serum triiodothyronine concentration, was significantly decreased at the end of treatment. After 6 weeks of treatment, the response in 3 dogs to thyrotropin administration was substantially reduced. Radionuclide thyroid imaging of 2 dogs after t/smx treatment revealed higher-than-normal thyroid technetium 99m pertechnetate uptake, suggestive of an interference with iodide metabolism.

Use of t/smx may cause hypothyroidism, and inadequate thyroid function may be incorrectly diagnosed in dogs treated with this antimicrobial.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To evaluate efficacy and nephrotoxicity of amphotericin B lipid complex used for treatment of dogs with naturally developing blastomycosis.

Design

Prospective clinical trial.

Animals

11 dogs with blastomycosis.

Procedure

All dogs were treated with an amphotericin B lipid complex. Two dogs received a cumulative dose of 8 mg/kg of body weight, 1 received a cumulative dose of 10 mg/kg, and 8 received a cumulative dose of 12 mg/kg.

Results

The 2 dogs that received a cumulative dose of 8 mg/kg and 1 of the dogs that received a cumulative dose of 12 mg/kg had a relapse of blastomycosis within 30 days after treatment. Seven of the remaining 8 dogs were clinically free of blastomycosis 6 months after treatment. One dog died of an unrelated cause 5.5 months after treatment, but did not have clinical signs of blastomycosis at the time of death. There were not any adverse clinical effects attributable to drug administration in any of the dogs in this study, and none of the dogs developed clinical signs of renal disease or failure.

Clinical Implications

Amphotericin B lipid complex was a safe and effective treatment for blastomycosis in these dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:2073–2075)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association