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  • Author or Editor: Carlos A. Trincado x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of vaccination protocols with modified-live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine on persistence and transmission of virus in pigs infected with a homologous isolate and determine clinical and virologic responses following heterologous viral challenge.

Animals—Four hundred forty 6- to 8-week-old PRRSV-naïve pigs.

Procedures—Pigs were allocated into 5 groups. Groups A to D were inoculated with wild-type PRRSV VR2332. Group A (positive control pigs) received PRRSV only. Groups B, C, and D received modified-live PRRSV vaccine (1, 2, or 3 doses). Group E served as a negative control group. To evaluate viral transmission, sentinel pigs were introduced into each group at intervals from 37 to 67, 67 to 97, and 97 to 127 days postinoculation (DPI). To evaluate persistence, pigs were euthanized at 37, 67, 97, or 127 DPI. To assess clinical and virologic response after challenge, selected pigs from each group were inoculated at 98 DPI with a heterologous isolate (PRRSV MN-184).

Results—Mass vaccination significantly reduced the number of persistently infected pigs at 127 DPI. Vaccination did not eliminate wild-type PRRSV; administration of 2 or 3 doses of modified-live virus vaccine reduced viral shedding after 97 DPI. Previous exposure to wild-type and vaccine virus reduced clinical signs and enhanced growth following heterologous challenge but did not prevent infection.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings suggest that therapeutic vaccination may help to reduce economic losses of PRRSV caused by infection; further studies to define the role of modified-live virus vaccines in control-eradication programs are needed.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the influences of animal age, bacterial coinfection, and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolate pathogenicity on virus concentration in pigs.

Animals—Twenty-one 2-month-old pigs and eighteen 6-month-old pigs.

Procedure—Pigs were grouped according to age and infected with mildly virulent or virulent isolates of PRRSV. The role of concurrent bacterial infection was assessed by infecting selected pigs with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae 21 days prior to inoculation with PRRSV. On alternating days, blood and swab specimens of nasal secretions and oropharyngeal secretions were collected. On day 21 after inoculation with PRRSV, selected tissues were harvested. Concentrations of PRRSV were determined by use of quantitative real-time PCR and expressed in units of TCID50 per milliliter (sera and swab specimens) or TCID50 per gram (tissue specimens).

Results—Concentrations of virus were higher in blood and tonsils of pigs infected with virulent PRRSV. Pigs infected with virulent PRRSV and M hyopneumoniae had significantly higher concentrations of viral RNA in lymphoid and tonsillar tissue. Coinfection with M hyopneumoniae resulted in a higher viral load in oropharyngeal swab specimens and blood samples, independent of virulence of the PRRSV isolate. Two-month-old pigs had significantly higher viral loads in lymph nodes, lungs, and tracheal swab specimens than did 6-month-old pigs, independent of virulence of the PRRSV isolate.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Multiple factors affect PRRSV concentration in pigs, including pathogenicity of the PRRSV isolate, age, and concurrent infection with M hyopneumoniae.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research